Albert, Susan Wittig 1940–

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Albert, Susan Wittig 1940–

(Robin Paige, a joint pseudonym; Susan Wittig)

PERSONAL: Born January 2, 1940, in Maywood, IL; daughter of John H. and Lucille (Franklin) Webber; married (divorced); married William Albert (a writer), 1986; children (first marriage): Robert, Robin, Michael. Ethnicity: "Caucasian." Education: University of Illinois, B.A., 1967; University of California—Berkeley, Ph.D., 1972. Hobbies and other interests: Gardening.

ADDRESSES: Home—Bertram, TX. Office—c/o P.O. Box 1616, Bertram, TX 78605. Agent—c/o Author Mail, Berkley Prime Crime Publicity, 375 Hudson St., New York, NY 10014. E-mail[email protected]; [email protected]

CAREER: University of San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, instructor, 1969–71; University of Texas, Austin, TX, assistant professor, 1972–77, associate professor, 1977–79, associate dean of graduate school, 1977–79; Sophie Newcomb College, New Orleans, LA, dean, 1979–81; Southwest Texas State University, San Marcos, TX, graduate dean, 1981–82, vice president for academic affairs, 1982–86, professor of English, 1981–87; full-time writer, 1987–. Editor, China's Garden newsletter, 1994–97; Story Circle Network, Inc., founder, 1997, president, beginning 1997; editor, Story Circle Journal, 1997–.

MEMBER: Sisters in Crime, Mystery Writers of America, Garden Writers of America, International Herb Association, Herb Society of America, Story Circle Network.

AWARDS, HONORS: Danforth graduate fellowship, 1967–72; nominee, Agatha and Anthony Awards, Best First Mystery, 1992; Hangman's Root named to Texas Monthly's list of notable books, 1994.

WRITINGS:

NONFICTION

(Under name Susan Wittig; translator with others, and editor) The Poetics of Composition, University of California Press (Berkeley, CA), 1973.

(Under name Susan Wittig) Steps to Structure: An Introduction to Composition and Rhetoric (textbook), Winthrop Publishers (Cambridge, MA), 1975.

(Under name Susan Wittig; editor) Structuralism: An Interdisciplinary Study, Pickwick Press (Pittsburgh, PA), 1975.

(Under name Susan Wittig) Stylistic and Narrative Structures in the Middle English Verse Romances, University of Texas Press (Austin, TX), 1977.

(Under name Susan Wittig; with others) The Participating Reader (textbook), Prentice-Hall (Englewood Cliffs, NJ), 1978.

Work of Her Own: How Women Create Success and Fulfillment off the Traditional Career Track, Putnam (New York, NY), 1992, published as Work of Her Own: A Woman's Guide to Success off the Career Track, foreword by Diane Fassell, Putnam (New York, NY), 1994.

Writing from Life: Telling Your Soul's Story, Putnam (New York, NY), 1997.

(Editor and author of introductions, with Dayna Finet) With Courage and Common Sense: Memoirs from the Older Women's Legacy Circles, foreword by Liz Carpenter, University of Texas Press (Austin, TX), 2003.

"CHINA BAYLES" MYSTERY NOVELS

Thyme of Death, Scribner (New York, NY), 1992.

Witches' Bane, Scribner (New York, NY), 1993.

Hangman's Root, Scribner (New York, NY), 1994.

Rosemary Remembered, Berkley (New York, NY), 1995.

Rueful Death, Berkley (New York, NY), 1996.

Love Lies Bleeding, Berkley (New York, NY), 1997.

Chile Death, Berkley (New York, NY), 1998.

Lavender Lies, Berkley (New York, NY), 1999.

Mistletoe Man, Berkley (New York, NY), 2000.

Bloodroot, Berkley (New York, NY), 2001.

Indigo Dying, Berkley (New York, NY), 2002.

An Unthymely Death and Other Garden Mysteries, Berkley (New York, NY), 2003.

A Dilly of a Death, Berkley (New York, NY), 2004.

Dead Man's Bones, Berkley (New York, NY), 2005.

Bleeding Hearts, Berkley (New York, NY), 2006.

China Bayles' Herbal Book of Days, Berkley (New York, NY), 2006.

"BEATRIX POTTER" MYSTERY NOVELS

The Tale of Hill Top Farm: The Cottage Tales of Beatrix Potter, Berkley (New York, NY), 2004.

The Tale of Holly How, Berkley (New York, NY), 2005.

The Tale of Cuckoo Brow Wood, Berkley (New York, NY), in press.

"KATE AND CHARLES" MYSTERY NOVELS; WITH HUSBAND, BILL ALBERT, UNDER JOINT PSEUDONYM ROBIN PAIGE

Death at Bishop's Keep, Berkley (New York, NY), 1994.

Death at Gallow's Green, Berkley (New York, NY), 1995.

Death at Daisy's Folly, Berkley (New York, NY), 1997.

Death at Devil's Bridge, Berkley (New York, NY), 1998.

Death at Rottingdean, Berkley (New York, NY), 1999.

Death at Whitechapel, Berkley (New York, NY), 2000.

Death at Epsom Downs, Berkley (New York, NY), 2001.

Death at Dartmoor, Berkley (New York, NY), 2002.

Death at Glamis Castle, Berkley (New York, NY), 2003.

Death at Blenheim Palace, Berkley (New York, NY), 2004.

Death in Hyde Park, Berkley (New York, NY), 2004.

Death on the Lizard, Berkley (New York, NY), 2006.

OTHER

Also author or coauthor of at least sixty children's books, including several mysteries in the "Nancy Drew" and "Hardy Boys" series; volume editor of Soundings (journal), summer, 1975.

WORK IN PROGRESS: Spanish Dagger (a China Bayles mystery), Berkley (New York, NY), expected April, 2007; A Land Full of Stories: Women Write about the Southwest (edited anthology of nature writing), University of Texas Press (Austin, TX), expected spring, 2007.

SIDELIGHTS: The protagonist of Susan Wittig Albert's "China Bayles" mystery series is a former attorney who leaves the career fast track to open an herb shop in the west Texas hill town of Pecan Springs. In many ways the concept is autobiographical: Albert, a university professor and administrator, was on the fast track herself in the 1970s and 1980s, before leaving her vice presidency at Southwest Texas State University in 1985. Since her departure, she has written full time. She began writing the "China Bayles" mysteries with Thyme of Death in 1992, and in the mid-1990s she and her husband, Bill Albert, started a series of Victorian mysteries under the joint pseudonym of Robin Paige.

China Bayles, forty-two years old when the series begins, opens an herb shop, and next door, her best friend Ruby sells crystals and other New Age paraphernalia. As Thyme of Death begins, another friend of China's, Jo Gilbert, dies from an overdose of sleeping pills and vodka. China knows that her late friend was battling breast cancer, but she is not willing to accept the explanation that Jo simply committed suicide. Soon China and Ruby uncover several suspects, most notably Jo's former lesbian lover and a local developer who tried to put an airport in Pecan Springs (a plan opposed by Jo and the activist group she organized to lobby against it).

Although Thyme of Death was nominated for both the Agatha and Anthony awards as Best First Mystery of 1992, a Publishers Weekly reviewer suggested that readers might have "mixed feelings about the story's conclusion." John Benson of Armchair Detective felt that "the 'why-I-left-the-law' aspects" are "heavy-handed," but went on to say that China "has the potential to grow in later installments." Stuart Miller of Booklist wrote: "This murder-in-a-small town story keeps your interest," and Judyth Rigler of the San Antonio Express-News stated that the novel is "lively and engaging."

Witches' Bane, the next book in the series, begins at Halloween. Ruby has provoked a local preacher by offering a class in reading tarot cards. However, the preacher is not the only one opposed to Ruby's classes, since there have been several recent murders in Pecan Springs attributed to Satanism. Other bizarre crimes follow: animals are found dead, ritually slaughtered as though for sacrifice, and Ruby discovers that the ritual knife from her shop has been stolen. To further complicate speculation about the source of the crimes, a cross has been burned on the lawn of a Jewish woman's home, an apparent act of the Ku Klux Klan. Ruby suspects that the Reverend is behind it all, but China digs deeper to find the truth.

A number of reviewers observed that Witches' Bane showed improvement from the first book. Although a Kirkus Reviews critic found the villain too obvious, the reviewer called the second book "an improvement over China's debut." Booklist critic Emily Melton termed it "an entertaining and engaging story," and a reviewer in Publishers Weekly wrote that "Albert's lively mystery captures the flavor of a modern small town being reshaped by big-city refugees."

Albert's next entry in the series, Hangman's Root, revolves around the murder of a biology professor who has earned plenty of enemies through both his acerbic nature and his experiments involving animals. Police suspect Dottie Riddle, a friend of China's who loves animals, but China is not convinced and determines to find the real culprit. With earlier books in the series, some critics had found the digressions concerning herbs to be a bit excessive, but this time a Publishers Weekly reviewer offered a different opinion: "Despite a slow start and little herbal lore, the plot unfolds briskly and with sly humor." A Kirkus Reviews contributor observed that Hangman's Root offers "more serious plotting and a more generous distribution of suspicion." The book made Texas Monthly's list of notable books for 1994.

Whereas in earlier books, China's female friends played a major role, Rosemary Remembered places greater emphasis on China's boyfriend, Mike McQuaid, a former police officer. The "Rosemary" of the title is Rosemary Robbins, McQuaid's accountant, who bears a striking resemblance to China. When Rosemary is murdered, it appears that someone is out to get China. She and McQuaid go up against the killer, while China befriends McQuaid's eleven-year-old son. "Herb lore and China's game approach to everyday problems, as well as extraordinary ones," wrote a Publishers Weekly contributor, "make this Rosemary memorable, indeed." Booklist critic Emily Melton concluded that "readers will enjoy Albert's wonderfully original characters and her amusing descriptions of life in a small Texas town as much as the intriguing plot." Likewise, a critic for Kirkus Reviews called Rosemary Remembered "Albert's strongest book yet."

With Rueful Death, China grows closer to McQuaid and his son—so close, in fact, that she needs a break. She goes to a remote monastery for a retreat, but of course she cannot get away from murder and intrigue. The sisters are in turmoil over a plan to turn the quiet monastery into a glitzy conference center, and China has to sort through two deaths, a parcel of poison-pen letters, and a spate of arson. Rueful Death is, in the words of a Publishers Weekly reviewer, "a page-turner [with] soul to spare." Stuart Miller, writing in Booklist, described the book as a "well-plotted mystery with strong characters."

Love Lies Bleeding marks a departure from the previous five novels. Returning from the monastery, China is determined to marry McQuaid—but when she gets back to Pecan Springs, she discovers that he has found someone else. Her personal situation is further complicated when, after being urged by Ruby to look into the murder of a former Texas Ranger, she discovers that McQuaid has a connection to the killing. In the end, China must join forces with McQuaid's lover to solve the case. A reviewer in Publishers Weekly thought China had "turn[ed] unexpectedly wimpish" after being dumped by McQuaid. But a critic for Mystery Review praised the "shocking climax and cliffhanger ending," as well as Albert's "ear for Texas dialogue."

Chile Death finds China and McQuaid reconciled but coping with his paralysis, the result of a gunshot wound incurred on an assignment for the Texas Rangers. There are other new wrinkles in China's life: She has begun writing for the local newspaper, while Ruby is trying to convince her that they should go into business together. Meanwhile, a mystery arises when a judge in a chili-cooking contest has a fatal allergic reaction to one of the ingredients. China and McQuaid suspect foul play, and they know several people who might have wanted to kill the victim. Booklist reviewer John Rowen felt the book "offers a surprising climax, beautiful Texas Hill Country atmosphere, solid police procedural details, and lots of information on herbs and chili (including recipes)." A Publishers Weekly critic remarked that Chile Death has "a satisfying plot, not too spicy, just right."

In Lavender Lies, China and McQuaid, who has become acting police chief of Pecan Springs, are about to be married—but first they must solve the murder of an unscrupulous real estate developer. There are numerous suspects, including his wife, to whom he was unfaithful, and the members of the city council, whom he was blackmailing. As in previous books in the series, there is much detail about Pecan Springs and its quirky denizens. In another Booklist review Rowen commented that the novel "starts slow but rallies with a tantalizing plot, a surprise ending, and some great dialogue." A Kirkus Reviews contributor thought "the murderer is easily spotted in advance," but "the motive will surprise you."

China and McQuaid finally get married, and as Mistletoe Man opens, they are thrilled with their life together. China's herb shop is thriving, and she and Ruby have added a tea room. Then China and Ruby begin to have trouble getting along, and shortly before Christmas, the curmudgeonly man who gathers mistletoe for the shop is killed by a hit-and-run driver. China, with help from her husband and friends, is soon seeking out the killer. "The mystery is taut and well plotted, the characters vivid and genuine," wrote GraceAnne A. DeCandido in Booklist.

In Bloodroot, China departs from the familiar surroundings of Pecan Springs and returns to her family's homestead in Mississippi. In order to make sense of a property battle, China must confront generations of accumulated family secrets and solve a possible murder, while helping her mother care for a beloved relative with a life-threatening illness. As a reviewer for Publishers Weekly noted, Albert takes China "into completely new territory, both geographically and emotionally," and creates "captivating new characters and a setting dripping with atmosphere." A Kirkus Reviews critic commented: "Albert stretches both herself and her well-adjusted, politically correct heroine to their limits by slotting China into the role of Hamlet, haunted by generations of melodramatic Ophelias demanding revenge."

Indigo Dying finds China back in Pecan Springs, where she is busy helping her friend, Allie Selby, plan a workshop about dyeing textiles for the Indigo Arts and Crafts Festival in nearby Indigo, Texas. Meanwhile, Allie's uncle announces that he has sold his mining rights in Indigo to a company that plans to strip-mine the town, which will destroy the cultural and economic progress the town has made. When Allie's uncle is shot and killed, China begins an investigation to find the killer. A critic for Publishers Weekly pointed out that "the heart" of Indigo Dying "is the detailed depiction of smalltown life in Indigo," and noted, "Albert does a nice job of placing believable red herrings in Bayles's way."

China once again plunges into a mystery in A Dilly of a Death when "Pickle Queen" Phoebe Morgan, whose family owns the largest pickle business in Texas, goes missing just before the Picklefest celebration. In the meantime, China's friend Ruby tries to get her pregnant daughter to reveal the identity of her baby's father. Even more questions arise when China realizes that a connection exists between the baby's father and Phoebe's disappearance. Booklist reviewer Jenny McLarin predicted that readers "will relish this more-sweet-than-sour adventure," and a contributor to Publishers Weekly concluded: "The only sour notes Albert hits in this dill-infused mystery are the terrible pickle jokes, but China's good sense and good humor easily compensate."

China's adventures continue in Dead Man's Bones, which a reviewer for MBR Bookwatch termed "an entertaining and diabolically clever amateur sleuth mystery." When one of the town's leading citizens, Jane Oberman, kills a man in self-defense, her sister is later poisoned. It is up to China to find a connection.

Albert has also written short stories about China and her pals. An Unthymely Death and Other Garden Mysteries features ten short mysteries and nearly a hundred sidebars about gardening and herbs. A Kirkus Reviews critic felt that the stories contained "minimal sleuthing" and "poorly tended plots," but believed that the "green-thumb crowd" would enjoy the gardening tips found throughout the collection.

In addition to her China Bayles mysteries, Albert has introduced a mystery series featuring children's author and illustrator Beatrix Potter. Among the titles in the "Beatrix Potter" series are The Tale of Hill Top Farm: The Cottage Tales of Beatrix Potter and The Tale of Holly How. Albert also has written and edited nonfiction books, including Work of Her Own: How Women Create Success and Fulfillment off the Traditional Career Track, Writing from Life: Telling Your Soul's Story, and With Courage and Common Sense: Memoirs from the Older Women's Legacy Circles. In Work of Her Own Albert offers the accounts of some eighty women (including herself), who left high-pressure jobs to seek fulfillment outside the fast lane. It also offers recommendations for women contemplating a change of career. Writing from Life is a guidebook for women interested in writing their own life stories. It includes writing exercises and promises to walk the reader through a process which will create an eight-chapter autobiography. "Albert's book," wrote a reviewer in Publishers Weekly, "brings charm and elegance to the view of writing as a process of self-discovery." With Courage and Common Sense is a collection of personal stories written by members of the Older Women's Legacy Circle, part of the Story Circle Network founded by Albert in 1997 to encourage women to write.

With her husband, Bill Albert, Albert coauthors a series of Victorian mystery novels published under the joint pseudonym Robin Paige. The novels feature sleuths Kate Ardleigh Sheridan, an Irish-American author of penny-dreadful books, and Sir Charles Sheridan, an amateur scientist with an interest in forensic technology. As the series begins, Kate travels to England after inheriting some money and an estate, eventually marrying Charles as they become involved in various mysteries. Along the way the pair encounter such historical figures as Rudyard Kipling, Jennie Churchill, the Prince of Wales, Beatrix Potter, Arthur Conan Doyle, Jack London, and Henry Rolls and Charles Royce.

Albert once told CA: "I've thought of myself as a writer ever since I could hold a pencil and make letters, but my first paid publication didn't come until I was nineteen and began a short-lived career—three or four years—as a juvenile fiction writer. After that, I went on to college and graduate school and learned how to write literary criticism in an appropriately academic style. When enough was enough, I went back to children's fiction and then turned to women's mystery fiction. I enjoy the multiple challenges of writing books in a series: developing characters over time and trying circumstances, creating multi-leveled plots that link several books, and keeping the themes and ideas fresh. (This often means defying critics' and readers' expectations and helping them to see new possibilities for growth in a familiar genre, with familiar characters and settings.) I also find great pleasure in working with my coauthor/husband, Bill Albert, who has a strong plot sense and a fine understanding of the dynamics of character development. It is always a fascinating challenge to work together to craft a coherent narrative out of two different stories—his and mine. (This is something like two architects designing a house, drawing the plans, building it, and then living in it together.) I am interested, as well, in women's stories and memoirs and look forward to doing more work with that subject in a few years—perhaps my own memoir, perhaps a critical study of the development of women's memoirs. The world is full of things to write about. I'll never run out of projects."

BIOGRAPHICAL AND CRITICAL SOURCES:

BOOKS

Heising, Willetta L., Detecting Women 2, Purple Moon Press (Dearborn, MI), 1996.

PERIODICALS

Armchair Detective, spring, 1993, John Benson, review of Thyme of Death, p. 109; spring, 1994, review of Witches' Bane, p. 233; spring, 1995, review of Hangman's Root, p. 210; winter, 1996, review of Death at Gallows Green, p. 110; winter, 1997, review of Rueful Death, p. 97.

Belles Lettres, winter, 1993, review of Witches' Bane, p. 53.

Booklist, November 15, 1992, Stuart Miller, review of Thyme of Death, pp. 581, 585; October 1, 1993, Emily Melton, review of Witches' Bane, p. 256; November 1, 1995, Emily Melton, review of Rosemary Remembered, pp. 456, 461; October 1, 1996, Stuart Miller, review of Rueful Death, p. 324; November 1, 1997, Emily Melton, review of Love Lies Bleeding, p. 456; October 15, 1998, John Rowen, review of Chile Death, p. 405; September 15, 1999, John Rowen, review of Lavender Lies, p. 235; September 15, 2000, GraceAnne A. DeCandido, review of Mistletoe Man, p. 221; March 1, 2001, Barbara Bibel, review of Death at Epsom Downs, p. 1231; May 1, 2001, Merle Jacob, review of Lavender Lies, p. 1607; January 1, 2004, Jenny McLarin, review of A Dilly of a Death, p. 829; November 1, 2004, GraceAnne A. DeCandido, review of The Tale of Hill Top Farm: The Cottage Tales of Beatrix Potter, p. 466.

Bookwatch, January, 1993, review of Work of Her Own: How Women Create Success and Fulfillment off the Traditional Career Track, p. 4; September, 1995, review of Death at Gallows Green, p. 10; September, 1996, review of Rosemary Remembered, p. 1; April, 2003, review of Death at Glamis Castle, p. 8; July, 2003, review of An Unthymely Death and Other Garden Mysteries, p. 1.

Drood Review of Mystery, July, 2000, reviews of Lavender Lies and Mistletoe Man, p. 14; January, 2001, review of Death at Epsom Downs, p. 22.

Feminist Mystery Reviews, October 13, 1997, review of Love Lies Bleeding.

Horticulture, Gardening at Its Best, August, 1993, review of Thyme of Death, p. 72; June, 1994, review of Witches' Bane, p. 76; February, 1995, review of Hangman's Root, p. 72.

Kirkus Reviews, September 1, 1992, review of Thyme of Death, p. 1089; August 15, 1993, review of Witches' Bane, p. 1028; August 1, 1994, review of Hangman's Root, p. 1023; September 15, 1995, review of Rosemary Remembered, p. 1308; September 1, 1996, review of Rueful Death, p. 1270; September 15, 1997, review of Love Lies Bleeding, p. 1420; September 1, 1999, review of Lavender Lies, p. 1345; August 15, 2001, review of Bloodroot, p. 1163; January 1, 2002, review of Death at Dartmoor, p. 20; December 1, 2002, review of Indigo Dying, p. 1740; January 1, 2003, review of Death at Glamis Castle, p. 30; April 15, 2003, review of An Unthymely Death and Other Garden Mysteries, p. 572; March 1, 2005, review of Dead Man's Bones, p. 259; May 15, 2005, review of The Tale of Holly How, p. 564.

Kliatt, May, 1999, review of Death at Rottingdean, p. 20.

Library Journal, October 1, 1992, Rex E. Klett, review of Thyme of Death, p. 122; October 15, 1992, Christy Zlatos, review of Work of Her Own, p. 78; October 1, 1993, Rex E. Klett, review of Witches' Bane, p. 130; October 10, 1993; October 1, 1995, Rex E. Klett, review of Rosemary Remembered, p. 124; September 15, 1996, p. 131; October 1, 1996, Rex E. Klett, review of Rueful Death, p. 131; November 15, 1996, Lisa J. Cihlar, review of Writing from Life: Telling Your Soul's Story, p. 69; November 1, 1998, Rex E. Klett, review of Chile Death, p. 129; February 15, 2000, Danna Bell-Russel, review of Lavender Lies, p. 212; October 1, 2000, Rex E. Klett, review of Mistletoe Man, p. 152; February 1, 2001, Rex E. Klett, review of Death at Epsom Downs, p. 127; June 1, 2004, Ann Kim, review of The Tale of Hill Top Farm, p. 109; October 1, 2004, Rex E. Klett, review of The Tale of Hill Top Farm, p. 62.

Los Angeles Times Book Review, December 10, 1995, review of Rosemary Remembered, p. 15.

MBR Bookwatch, March, 2005, Harriet Klausner, review of Death at Blenheim Place; April, 2005, review of Dead Man's Bones.

Mystery Review, winter, 1998, review of Love Lies Bleeding.

Publishers Weekly, August 3, 1992, review of Work of Her Own, p. 55; September 7, 1992, review of Thyme of Death, p. 81; September 12, 1994, review of Hangman's Root, p. 85; October 4, 1993, review of Witches' Bane, p. 67; September 4, 1995, review of Rosemary Remembered, p. 52; September 9, 1996, p. 66; September 16, 1996, review of Rueful Death, p. 73; December 2, 1996, review of Writing from Life, p. 52; October 13, 1997, review of Love Lies Bleeding, p. 59; October 5, 1998, review of Chile Death, p. 84; February 15, 1999, review of Death at Rottingdean, p. 105; September 18, 2000, review of Mistletoe Man, p. 91; February 5, 2001, review of Death at Epsom Downs, p. 72; September 24, 2001, review of Bloodroot, p. 72; January 28, 2002, review of Death at Dartmoor, p. 274; January 13, 2003, review of Indigo Dying, p. 41; February 3, 2003, review of Death at Glamis Castle, p. 58; May 5, 2003, review of An Unthymely Death and Other Garden Mysteries, p. 203; December 15, 2003, review of A Dilly of a Death, p. 57; February 9, 2004, review of Death in Hyde Park, p. 61; March 21, 2005, review of Dead Man's Bones, p. 39.

San Antonio Express-News, January 17, 1993, Judyth Rigler, review of Thyme of Death.

School Library Journal, January, 1999, Pam Johnson, review of Chile Death, p. 129; December, 2004, Jane Halsall, review of The Tale of Hill Top Farm, p. 174.

Voice of Youth Advocates, June, 2005, John Charles, review of The Tale of Hill Top Farm, p. 141.

ONLINE

Berkley Prime Crime Web site, http://berkleysignetmysteries.com/ (October 24, 2005), "Susan Wittig Albert."

Lifescapeshttp://susanalbert.typepad.com/lifescapes/ (October 18, 2005), author Web log.

Mystery Reader Web site, http://www.themysteryreader.com/ (October 26, 2001), Monica Pope, review of Mistletoe Man.

Partners in Crime Headquarters, http://www.mysterypartners.com/ (October 18, 2005), Susan Wittig Albert and Bill Albert Home Page.

Story Circle Network, http://www.storycircle.org/ (October 18, 2005).

Writers Write: The Internet Writing Journal, http://www.writerswrite.com/ (October 18, 2005), Claire E. White, "A Conversation with Susan Wittig Albert."

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