Haym (Haim), Nicola Francesco

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Haym (Haim), Nicola Francesco

Haym (Haim), Nicola Francesco, Italian cellist, composer, and librettist of German descent; b. Rome, July 6, 1678; d. London, Aug. 11, 1729. He was a violone player in the private orch. of Cardinal Ottoboni in Rome under Corelli (1694–1700), then went to London, where he was composer and cellist to the 2nd Duke of Bedford (1701–11). He later was a bass player in the employ of the Duke of Chandos. He was a major figure in organizing performances of Italian opera in London. In 1722 he became the official librettist and Italian secretary of the Royal Academy of Music, the business venture responsible for presenting Italian opera in London. His works include 2 oratorios, David sponsae resti-tutus (1699) and Santa Costanza (1700), a serenata, II reciproco amore di Tirsi e Clori (1699), a secular cantata, Lontan del idol mio (1704), and instrumental pieces, including 12 Sonate a tre (1703) and 12 Sonate a tre (1704). His historical importance, however, rests upon his adaptations for Handel’s scores, including Teseo (1713), Radamisto (1720), Ottone (1723), Flavio (1723), Giulio Cesare (1724), Tamerlano (1724), Rodelinda (1725), Siroe (1728), and Tolomeo (1728).

—Nicolas Slonimsky/Laura Kuhn/Dennis McIntire

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Haym (Haim), Nicola Francesco

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