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Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers

Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers ★★★★ 2002 (PG-13)

The second installment of the “Rings” trilogy does not disappoint. Picking up shortly after the first one left off, Frodo and Samwise are still heading toward Mordor, with Gollum following/abetting their progress. Aragorn, Legolas, and Gimli join together with the denizens of Rohan to fight Saruman's army of Orcs. Gandalf is back to make with the white magic heroics as well. Plenty of action (the battle scenes are incredible) and plot twists (Frodo's battle of wills with himself and Gollum add yet more depth to both characters), provide enough entertainment to keep the chat rooms humming until the last chapter comes out. Speaking of final chapters, George Lucas must be sweating bullets right about now. 179m/C VHS, DVD . US Elijah Wood, Sean Astin, Viggo Mortensen, Orlando Bloom, John Rhys-Davies, Ian McKellen, Christopher Lee, Billy Boyd, Dominic Monaghan, Liv Tyler, Bernard Hill, Miranda Otto, David Wenham, Karl Urban, Brad Dourif, Cate Blanchett, Hugo Weaving; D: Peter Jackson; W: Peter Jackson, Fran Walsh, Philippa Boyens, Stephen Sinclair; C: Andrew Lesnie; M: Howard Shore; V: John Rhys-Davies, Andy Serkis. Oscars ‘02: Visual FX; British Acad. ‘02: Costume Des., Visual FX.

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