Paddleford, Clementine (1900–1967)

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Paddleford, Clementine (1900–1967)

American food editor and columnist. Born Clementine Haskin Paddleford in Stockdale, Kansas, on September 27, 1900; died on November 13, 1967; daughter of Solon Marian Paddleford (a prosperous farmer) and Jennie (Romick) Paddleford; Kansas State College School of Journalism, B.A., 1921; graduate work at New York University; married Lloyd D. Zimmerman (an engineer), on July 10, 1923 (separated within the year and divorced in 1932); children: (ward) Clare Duffe.

Once referred to by Time magazine as "the best-known food editor in the United States," Clementine Paddleford wrote for the New York Herald Tribune, the monthly magazine Gourmet, and This Week, the syndicated Sunday magazine. Paddleford, who grew up in her mother's kitchen in Kansas, became women's editor of Farm and Fireside (1924–29), before turning to freelance writing. In 1932, doctors removed a malignant growth from her larynx and vocal cords. It took her six months to relearn speech and far longer to deal with the self-consciousness imposed by her now husky voice and the tube that would remain in her throat to aid her breathing. She joined the Herald Tribune in 1936.