Skip to main content

Robertson, Jeannie (1908–1975)

Robertson, Jeannie (1908–1975)

Scottish folksinger. Born 1908 in Aberdeen, Scotland; died Mar 13, 1975, in Aberdeen; children: Lizzie Higgins (folksinger).

Folksinger who had a profound influence on folk music revival, was one of the "traveling people" who went to Blairgowrie to pick raspberries once a year and whose music was passed down orally from generation to generation; was virtually unknown beyond northeast Scotland until discovered by Scottish folklorist Hamish Henderson (1953); met Alan Lomax; began recording extensively (1950s), mostly on Lomax label; made the earliest known recording of "The Battle of Harlow"; also recorded the celebrated "I'm a Man You Don't Meet Every Day" (also known as "Jock Stewart"); albums include The Queen Among the Heather: The Alan Lomax Portrait Series (1998). Awarded MBE (1968).

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Robertson, Jeannie (1908–1975)." Dictionary of Women Worldwide: 25,000 Women Through the Ages. . Encyclopedia.com. 18 Sep. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Robertson, Jeannie (1908–1975)." Dictionary of Women Worldwide: 25,000 Women Through the Ages. . Encyclopedia.com. (September 18, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/women/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/robertson-jeannie-1908-1975

"Robertson, Jeannie (1908–1975)." Dictionary of Women Worldwide: 25,000 Women Through the Ages. . Retrieved September 18, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/women/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/robertson-jeannie-1908-1975

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.