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jam

jam1 / jam/ • v. (jammed , jam·ming ) 1. [tr.] squeeze or pack (someone or something) tightly into a specified space: four of us were jammed in one compartment people jammed their belongings into cars. ∎  push (something) roughly and forcibly into position or a space: he jammed his hat on. ∎  [tr.] crowd onto (a road) so as to block it: the roads were jammed with traffic. ∎  [tr.] cause (telephone lines) to be continuously busy with a large number of calls: listeners jammed WBOQ's switchboard with calls. ∎  [intr.] push or crowd into an area or space: 75,000 refugees jammed into a stadium today to denounce the accord. 2. become or make unable to move or work due to a part seizing or becoming stuck: [intr.] the photocopier jammed | [tr.] the doors were jammed open. ∎  [tr.] make (a radio transmission) unintelligible by causing interference. 3. [intr.] inf. improvise with other musicians, esp. in jazz or blues: the opportunity to jam with Atlanta blues musicians. • n. 1. an instance of a machine or thing seizing or becoming stuck: paper jams. ∎ inf. an awkward situation or predicament: I'm in a jam. ∎ short for traffic jam. ∎  Climbing a handhold obtained by stuffing a part of the body such as a hand or foot into a crack in the rock. 2. (also jam ses·sion) an informal gathering of musicians improvising together, esp. in jazz or blues. PHRASES: jam on the brakes operate the brakes of a vehicle suddenly and forcibly, typically in an emergency.jam2 • n. a sweet spread or preserve made from fruit and sugar boiled to a thick consistency.

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jelly and jam

jelly and jam, gelatinous, sweet food prepared by preserving fresh fruits. Since most fresh fruits contain about 80% water and from 10% to 15% sugar, they are subject to fermentation. They may be preserved by adding sugar and reducing the water content. Almost any fresh fruit can be made into jam by mashing or slicing it fine, adding an approximately equal amount of sugar, and simmering until it reaches the proper concentration or gel at 218° to 222°F (103°–105°C). Preserves differ from jam in that the fruit retains its form. For jelly, only those fruits may successfully be used that contain a sufficient amount of pectin (the chief gelling substance) and acid. Among these are plums, apples, grapes, and quinces and such berries as currants, gooseberries, raspberries, blackberries, and cranberries. Pectin or gelatin may be added to other fruits, such as peaches and strawberries, but the results do not equal the natural jellies. Jelly is made by extracting the juice of fresh, sound, barely ripe fruit, combining it with sugar, and cooking. Excess heating dissipates the flavor and may hydrolyze the pectin. Too little sugar yields a tough jelly; too much, a sticky one. Too much acid may cause separation of liquid. The manufacture of jams and jellies is now largely commercial.

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jelly

jel·ly / ˈjelē/ • n. (pl. -lies) a sweet, clear, semisolid, somewhat elastic spread or preserve made from fruit juice and sugar boiled to a thick consistency. ∎  used figuratively and in similes to refer to sensations of fear or strong emotion: her legs felt like jelly. ∎  a similar clear preparation made with fruit or other ingredients as a condiment: roast pheasant with red currant jelly. ∎  a gelatinous savory preparation made by boiling meat and bones. ∎  any substance of a gelatinous consistency: spermicidal jellies | frogs lay eggs coated in jelly. ∎  chiefly Brit. a sweet, fruit-flavored gelatin dessert. ∎  (jellies) jelly shoes. • v. (-lies, -lied) [tr.] [usu. as adj.] (jellied) set (food) as or in a jelly: jellied cranberry sauce jellied eels. DERIVATIVES: jel·li·fi·ca·tion / ˌjeləfiˈkāshən/ n.jel·li·fy / ˈjeləˌfī/ v.jel·ly·like / -ˌlīk/ adj.

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jelly

jelly
1. Clear jam made from strained fruit juice by boiling with sugar. Also used in this sense in north America to mean any jam.

2. Table jelly is a dessert made from gelatine, sweetened and flavoured; known in north America as jello; patented in New York by Peter Cooper (1842) as a coloured fruit flavoured gelatine powder for desserts; Jell‐O first marketed by Pearl B. Wait of LeRoy, NY, in 1897.

3. Aspic is a savoury jelly made from gelatinous stock.

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jelly

jelly article of food consisting chiefly of gelatin. XIV. ME. geli, -y(e) — (O)F. gelée frost, jelly = It. gelata frost :- Rom. gelāta, sb. use of fem. pp. of gelāre freeze, f. gelu frost (cf. CONGEAL).
Hence jellied XVI; (back-formation) jell vb. orig. U.S. XIX.

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jam

jam A conserve of fruit boiled to a pulp with sugar; sets to a pectin jelly on cooling. (Known in the USA as jelly.) Standard jam, with certain exceptions, contains a minimum of 35 g of fruit per 100 g; extra jam, with certain exceptions, contains 45 g.

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Jam

Jam

a crush or squeeze; a mass of things or persons tightly crowded.

Examples: jam of carriages, 1858; of humankind, 1807; of people, 1860; of tartsLipton, 1970; of trees, 1838; traffic jam.

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jam

jam1 press or squeeze tightly. XVIII. of symbolic orig.
Hence sb. XIX.

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jam

jam2 conserve of fruit. XVIII. perh. identical with prec. sb.

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jam

jam: see jelly and jam.

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jam

jamam, Amsterdam, Assam, Bram, cam, cham, cheongsam, clam, cram, dam, damn, drachm, dram, exam, femme, flam, gam, glam, gram, ham, jam, jamb, lam, lamb, mam, mesdames, Omar Khayyám, Pam, pram, pro-am, ram, Sam, scam, scram, sham, Siam, slam, Spam, swam, tam, tram, Vietnam, wham, yam •in memoriam • ad nauseam •iamb, Priam •grandam • Edam • goddam •quondam • Potsdam • cofferdam •Rotterdam • Oxfam • Birmingham •Abraham • logjam • CAD-CAM •minicam • Nicam •Eelam, Elam •flimflam • oriflamme • Suriname •ad personam • diazepam • tangram •ashram • telegram • milligram •epigram • centigram • dithyramb •program, programme •cardiogram • radiogram • echogram •mammogram •aerogramme (US aerogram) •microgram • dirham •electrocardiogram • ideogram •heliogram • diaphragm • diagram •parallelogram • kilogram • hologram •encephalogram • anagram •monogram • sonogram • kissogram •pentagram • cryptogram • photogram •tam-tam • wigwam • whim-wham

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jelly

jellybelly, Botticelli, casus belli, Corelli, Delhi, deli, Ellie, Grappelli, jelly, Kelly, lamellae, Machiavelli, Mahaweli, nelly, Schiaparelli, Shelley, shelly, smelly, tagliatelle, telly, Torricelli, vermicelli, welly, Zeffirelli •trebly •assembly, trembly •deadly, Hedley, medley, redly •friendly • freckly •cleanly, eco-friendly, user-friendly •heavenly • fleshly • wetly • directly •Bentley • deathly •Lesley, Leslie, Presley, Wesley •yellow-belly • underbelly •bailey, bailie, capercaillie, Cayley, ceilidh, daily, Daley, Daly, Disraeli, Eilidh, feyly, gaily, Haley, Hayley, Israeli, Rayleigh, scaly, shaly, ukulele •ably • ungainly • maidenly • shapely •stately • saintly • paisley • Ainsley •comradely

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jam

jam jam tomorrow and jam yesterday, but never jam today used to express resignation or regret for opportunity failing to present itself; this proverbial saying derives from Lewis Carroll's Through the Looking-Glass (1872), ‘The rule is, jam to-morrow and jam yesterday—but never jam today.’ In the 1960s, this was reworked by the Labour politician Tony Benn (1925– ), ‘Some of the jam we thought was for tomorrow, we've already eaten.’

See also money for jam.

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Jam

Jam ★ 2006

That's jam as in traffic, not food product, or Phish concert. Sitcom characters and situations abound as 15 weary souls are trapped in their cars after an accident on a mountain road. It's Father's Day—so everyone can exchange trite stories. A woman goes into labor (ah, that old chestnut!). There's a couple of bumbling crooks and even a kitchen sink ‘cause someone's driving a camper. 91m/C DVD . Jeffrey Dean Morgan, William Forsythe, Gina Torres, Amanda Detmer, Jonathan Silverman, Marianne Jean-Baptiste, Dan Byrd, David DeLuise, Elizabeth Bogush, Tess Harper, Alex Rocco, Christopher Amitrano, Christopher Amitrano, Julie Claire, Amanda Foreman; D: Craig Sterling; W: Craig Sterling, Nicole Lonner; C: Jeff Venditti; M: Andy Kubiszewski. VIDEO

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