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bottle

bot·tle / ˈbätl/ • n. a container, typically made of glass or plastic and with a narrow neck, used for storing drinks or other liquids: a bottle of soda pop. ∎  the contents of such a container: he managed to put away a bottle of wine. ∎  (the bottle) inf. used in reference to heavy drinking: more women are taking to the bottle. ∎  a bottle fitted with a nipple for giving milk or other drinks to babies and very young children: a bottle of formula. ∎  (the bottle) the milk given to a baby from such a bottle: the age at which parents want a baby to give up the bottle varies. ∎  a large metal cylinder holding liquefied gas. • v. [tr.] (usu. be bottled) place (drinks or other liquid) in bottles or jars: the wine is then bottled. ∎  [usu. as adj.] (bottled) store (gas) in a container in liquefied form: connecting the bottled gas to the stove. PHRASES: hit the bottle inf. drink heavily.PHRASAL VERBS: bottle something up repress or conceal feelings over a period of time: learning how to express anger instead of bottling it up. DERIVATIVES: bot·tler n.

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bottle

bottle The traditional wine bottle holds 700, 720, or 750 mL of wine, depending on the variety; within the EU wine bottles are standardized at 700 mL.

A two‐bottle size is a magnum, four is a Jeroboam or double magnum, six a Methuselah, twelve a Salmanzar, and twenty a Nebuchadnezzar.

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Bottle

Bottle

bundle of hay or straw, 1386.

Examples: bottle of furs, 1578; of hay, 1486; of lupins, 1601; of straw, 1798.

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bottle

bottle XIV. — OF. botele, botaille (mod. bouteille) :- medL. butticula, dim. of late L. buttis BUTT4.

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bottle

bottlebattle, cattle, chattel, embattle, prattle, rattle, Seattle, tattle •fractal •cantle, covenantal, mantel, mantle, Prandtl •pastel • Fremantle • tittle-tattle •startle, stratal •Nahuatl •fettle, kettle, metal, mettle, nettle, petal, Popocatépetl, settle •dialectal, rectal •dental, gentle, mental, Oriental, parental, rental •transeptal •festal, vestal •gunmetal •antenatal, fatal, hiatal, natal, neonatal, ratel •beetle, betel, chital, decretal, fetal •blackbeetle •acquittal, belittle, brittle, committal, embrittle, it'll, kittle, little, remittal, skittle, spittle, tittle, victual, whittle •edictal, rictal •lintel, pintle, quintal •Bristol, Chrystal, crystal, pistol •varietal • coital • phenobarbital •orbital • pedestal • sagittal • vegetal •digital • skeletal • Doolittle •congenital, genital, primogenital, urogenital •capital • lickspittle • hospital • marital •entitle, mistitle, recital, requital, title, vital •subtitle • surtitle •axolotl, bottle, dottle, glottal, mottle, pottle, throttle, wattle •fontal, horizontal •hostel, intercostal, Pentecostal •greenbottle • bluebottle • Aristotle •chortle, immortal, mortal, portal •Borstal •anecdotal, sacerdotal, teetotal, total •coastal, postal •subtotal •brutal, footle, pootle, refutal, rootle, tootle •buttle, cuttle, rebuttal, scuttle, shuttle, subtle, surrebuttal •buntal, contrapuntal, frontal •crustal • societal • pivotal •hurtle, kirtle, myrtle, turtle

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