bloom

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bloom / bloōm/ • n. 1. a flower, esp. one cultivated for its beauty: an exotic bloom. ∎  the state or period of flowering: the apple trees were in bloom. ∎  the state or period of greatest beauty, freshness, or vigor: a young girl, still in the bloom of youth. 2. [in sing.] a youthful or healthy glow in a person's complexion: her face had lost its usual bloom. 3. a delicate powdery surface deposit on certain fresh fruits, leaves, or stems. ∎  a rapid growth of microscopic algae or cyanobacteria in water, often resulting in a colored scum on the surface. ∎  a grayish-white appearance on chocolate caused by cocoa butter rising to the surface. • v. [intr.] produce flowers; be in flower: a rose tree bloomed on a ruined wall. ∎  come into or be in full beauty or health; flourish: she bloomed as an actress under his tutelage. bloom2 • n. a mass of iron, steel, or other metal hammered or rolled into a thick bar for further working. ∎ hist. an unworked mass of puddled iron. • v. [tr.] [usu. as n.] (blooming) make (metal) into such a mass.

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Bloom ★★ Bl.m 2003 (R)

Rookie director Walsh's drab take of James Joyce's revered 1922 “Ulysses” lays out the events of Leopold Bloom's (Rea) daylong journey on June 16th, 1904 in Dublin as he deals with his wife Molly's (Ball) affair and serves as young poet Stephen's (O'Conor) mentor. 108m/C VHS, DVD . Stephen Rea, Angeline Ball, Hugh O'Conor, Neili Con-roy, Eoin McCarthy, Britta Smith, Paul Ronan, Alan Devlin, Alvaro Lucchesi, Maria Hayden, Mark Hu-berman, Kenneth McDonnell, Andrew McGibney, Dan Colley, Des Braiden, Donncha Crowley, Howard Jones, Russell Smith, Jimmy Keogh, Donal O'Kelly, Phelim Drew, Ronan Wilmot, Sarah Jane Drummey, Dearbhla Molloy, Jenny Maher, Ruai- dhri Finnegan, Eoin MacDonagh, Peter Gaynor, Rachael Pilkington, Jamie Baker, Maria Lennon, Steve Simmonds, Colman Hanley, Conor Delaney, Charlie Bonner, Alexander Downes, Eamon Ro- han, Luke Hayden, Julie Hale, Caoileann Murphy, Ciaran O'Brien, Dermot Moore, Maurice Shana-han, Seamus Walsh, Adam Fox Clarke; D: Sean Walsh; W: James Joyce; C: Ciaran Tanham; M: David Kahne. VIDEO

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bloomabloom, assume, backroom, bloom, Blum, boom, broom, brume, combe, consume, doom, entomb, exhume, flume, foredoom, fume, gloom, groom, Hume, illume, inhume, Khartoum, khoum, loom, neume, perfume, plume, presume, resume, rheum, room, spume, subsume, tomb, vroom, whom, womb, zoom •catacomb • heirloom • broadloom •taproom • guardroom • staffroom •darkroom • classroom • bathroom •bedroom, headroom •legroom • restroom •dayroom, playroom •saleroom • stateroom • salesroom •tearoom • green room • sickroom •anteroom • bridegroom • stockroom •strongroom • box room • washroom •storeroom • boardroom • ballroom •courtroom • houseroom • showroom •cloakroom • elbow room •poolroom, schoolroom •newsroom •gunroom, sunroom •mushroom • common room •workroom • hecatomb • vacuum •legume • volume • costume •Leverhulme

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bloom Dense population of microscopic algae or cyanobacteria on the surface of lakes or seas, often colouring the water. They may appear suddenly through migration of the population to the water surface. This occurs when the cells (previously mixed down into the water column by wind action) float or swim to the surface under calm conditions. They may arise also through rapid multiplication in response to large increases in nutrients. This happens when sewage, or other mineral-rich water, enters a lake or sea. Some blooms produce toxins, which can be harmful to marine life.

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bloom1 blossom, flower XIII; powdery deposit on fruits XVII. ME blom(e) — ON. blóm flower. blossom, and blómi prosperity, pl. flowers, corr. to OS. blómo, OHG. bluomo, -ma (G. blume). Goth. blóma :- Gmc. *blóma-, *blóman-, ōn-, f. *blð- BLOW2. For the OE. syn. See BLOSSOM.
Hence bloom vb. XIII.

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bloom Fat bloom is the whitish appearance on the surface of chocolate which sometimes occurs on storage. It is due either to a change in the form of the fat at the surface or to fat diffusing outwards and being deposited as crystals on the surface. Sugar bloom is less common; it is due to the deposition of sugar crystals on the surface.

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bloom2 mass of iron brought into the form of a thick bar. OE. blóma identical in form with BLOOM1, but prob. a different word.

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bloom See algal bloom.

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bloom See ALGAL BLOOM.