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gin

gin Alcoholic drink made by distilling fermented cereal, flavoured mainly with juniper berries together with coriander seeds, angelica, cinnamon, orange and lemon peel, and sometimes other botanicals. Distillate is diluted to 40% alcohol by volume, 220 kcal (925 kJ) per 100 mL. The name is derived from the French genièvre (juniper); originally known as geneva, Schiedam, or hollands, since it is Dutch in origin.

There are two types of English gin: Plymouth gin, with a fuller flavour, and London gin. Plymouth gin has a protected designation, and legally may only be distilled in Plymouth (Devon); it is made by adding the botanicals to the still, while for London gin the botanical extracts are added to the distilled liquor. Dutch and German gins are more strongly flavoured than English or American; steinhäger and schinkenhäger are distilled from a mash of wheat, barley, and juniper berries; wacholder is made from neutral spirit flavoured with juniper. Dutch gin may be jonge (young) or oude (aged, matured).

Pink gin is gin mixed with angostura bitters.

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gin

gin1 / jin/ • n. 1. a clear alcoholic spirit distilled from grain or malt and flavored with juniper berries. 2. (also gin rummy) a two-handed form of the card game rummy in which players are dealt ten cards each and attempt to produce a hand in which the point value of unmatched cards adds up to ten or less. gin2 • n. 1. a machine for separating cotton from its seeds. 2. a machine for raising and moving heavy weights. 3. (also gin trap) a snare for catching game. • v. (ginned, gin·ning) [tr.] 1. treat (cotton) in a gin. 2. trap (a person or animal) in a gin. DERIVATIVES: gin·ner n.

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gin

gin [archaic geneva, from Du. from O.Fr. from Lat.,=juniper], spirituous liquor distilled chiefly from fermented cereals, malted and unmalted, and flavored with juniper berries. It originated in Holland (thus the name Hollands, or Holland, gin) but is now manufactured also in other countries, chiefly England and the United States. A type of gin developed in England is known as London gin; it is more highly distilled than Holland gin. Dry gin has been highly rectified. Old Tom gin is sweetened for use as a liqueur. Sloe gin is flavored with fresh sloes instead of juniper.

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gin

gin1 †ingenuity, craft, trick; (arch.) contrivance, esp. for snaring game. XIII. Aphetic — OF. engin ENGINE.

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gin

gin2 ardent spirit distilled from grain and malt. XVIII. abbrev. of Geneva.

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gin

ginagin, akin, begin, Berlin, bin, Boleyn, Bryn, chin, chin-chin, Corinne, din, fin, Finn, Flynn, gaijin, gin, Glyn, grin, Gwyn, herein, Ho Chi Minh, in, inn, Jin, jinn, kin, Kweilin, linn, Lynn, mandolin, mandoline, Min, no-win, pin, Pinyin, quin, shin, sin, skin, spin, therein, thin, Tientsin, tin, Tonkin, Turin, twin, underpin, Vietminh, violin, wherein, whin, whipper-in, win, within, Wynne, yin •weigh-in • lutein • lie-in • Samhain •Bowen, Cohen, Owen, throw-in •heroin, heroine •benzoin •bruin, ruin, shoo-in •Bedouin • Islwyn •genuine, Menuhin •cabin, Scriabin •Portakabin • sin bin • swingbin •bobbin, dobbin, robin •haemoglobin (US hemoglobin) •Reuben • dubbin • dustbin • Jacobin •kitchen, lichen •Cochin • urchin

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