Boston: Introduction

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Boston: Introduction

The Atlantic Ocean has played an important role throughout Boston's history. Situated on one of the world's finest natural harbors, Boston was once the maritime capital of the colonial United States. Known variously as the birthplace of the American Revolution, the site of New England's largest fleet of clipper ships, meeting place of America's literati, and home of many venerable educational and cultural institutions, Boston remains the largest city in the six New England states. During the 1980s, Boston gained fame as a high technology and defense research center, as well as a good place in which to conduct business. This was in part attributable to the vast network of research facilities connected with schools in the region. Since the economic downturn that occurred in 1988 through 1992, the city has been enjoying an economic recovery, with several large ongoing projects that will improve its infrastructure, including the famous (or to some, infamous) Big Dig. The city remains one of the country's premier tourist attractions. In recent years, various sources have ranked Boston among the best large cities in which to live in the United States.

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