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private

pri·vate / ˈprīvit/ • adj. 1. belonging to or for the use of one particular person or group of people only: all bedrooms have private facilities his private plane. ∎  (of a situation, activity, or gathering) affecting or involving only a particular person or group of people: a small private service in the chapel. ∎  (of thoughts and feelings) not to be shared with or revealed to others: she felt awkward intruding on private grief. ∎  (of a person) not choosing to share thoughts and feelings with others: he was a very private man. ∎  (of a meeting or discussion) involving only a small number of people and dealing with matters that are not to be disclosed to others: this is a private conversation. ∎  (of a place) quiet and free from people who can interrupt: can we go somewhere a little more private? 2. (of a person) having no official or public role or position: the paintings were sold to a private collector. ∎  not connected with one's work or official position: the president was visiting China in a private capacity. 3. (of a service or industry) provided or owned by an individual or an independent, commercial company rather than by the government: research projects carried out by private industry more than 1,400 state enterprises that were about to go private. ∎  of or relating to a system of education or medical treatment conducted outside the system of government and charging fees to the individuals who make use of it. ∎  of, relating to, or denoting a transaction between individuals and not involving commercial organizations: it was a private sale—no agent's commission. • n. 1. a soldier of the lowest rank, in particular an enlisted person in the U.S. Army or Marine Corps ranking below private first class. 2. (privates) inf. short for private parts. PHRASES: in private with no one else present: I've got to talk to you in private.

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private

private † applied by Wyclif to the friars XIV; not open to the public; not holding a public position XV. — L. prīvātus withdrawn from public life, peculiar to oneself, sb. man in private life, prop. pp. of prīvāre bereave, deprive, f. prīvus single, individual, private; see -ATE2.
So privation depriving, being deprived XIV. — L. privative XVI. — F. or L. Hence privacy XV (rare before XVI). privateer vessel owned and officered by private persons holding letters of marque, commander of this. XVII.

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Private

PRIVATE

That which affects, characterizes, or belongs to an individual person, as opposed to the general public.

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private

private •davit • brevet • velvet • affidavit •civet, privet, rivet, trivet •private • covet • aquavit • banquet •halfwit • peewit • dimwit • nitwit •exquisite, visit •requisite • perquisite •closet, posit •apposite • opposite • composite

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