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flare

flare / fler/ • n. 1. a sudden brief burst of bright flame or light: the flare of the match lit up his face. ∎  a device producing a bright flame, used esp. as a signal or marker: a helicopter spotted a flare set off by the crew| [as adj.] a flare gun. ∎  [in sing.] a sudden burst of intense emotion: she felt a flare of anger within her. ∎  Astron. a sudden explosion in the chromosphere and corona of the sun or another star, resulting in an intense burst of radiation. See also solar flare. ∎  Photog. extraneous illumination on film caused by internal reflection in the camera. 2. [in sing.] a gradual widening, esp. of a skirt or pants: as you knit, add a flare or curve a hem. ∎  an upward and outward curve of a vessel’s bow, designed to throw the water outward when under way. • v. [intr.] 1. burn with a sudden intensity: the blaze across the water flared the bonfire crackled and flared up. ∎  (of a light or a person's eyes) glow with a sudden intensity: her eyes flared at the stinging insult. ∎  (of an emotion) suddenly become manifest in a person or their expression: alarm flared in her eyes tempers flared. ∎  (flare up) (of an illness or chronic medical complaint) recur unexpectedly and cause further discomfort: Tracy's pain has flared up again, this time almost beyond enduring. ∎  (esp. of an argument, conflict, or trouble) suddenly become more violent or intense: in 1943 the Middle East crisis flared up again. ∎  (flare up) (of a person) suddenly become angry: she flared up, shouting at Jeff. 2. [often as adj.] (flared) gradually become wider at one end: a flared skirt the dress flared out into huge a train. ∎  (of a person's nostrils) dilate: his head lifted, his nostrils flaring. ∎  [tr.] (of a person) cause (the nostrils) to dilate.

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flare

flare (flair) n.
1. reddening of the skin that spreads outwards from a focus of infection or irritation in the skin.

2. the red area surrounding an urticarial weal.

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flare

flare spread out, as hair, etc. XVI; burn with a spreading flame XVII. of unkn. orig.
Hence sb. XIX.

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flare

flareaffair, affaire, air, Altair, Althusser, Anvers, Apollinaire, Astaire, aware, Ayer, Ayr, bare, bear, bêche-de-mer, beware, billionaire, Blair, blare, Bonaire, cafetière, care, chair, chargé d'affaires, chemin de fer, Cher, Clair, Claire, Clare, commissionaire, compare, concessionaire, cordon sanitaire, couvert, Daguerre, dare, debonair, declare, derrière, despair, doctrinaire, éclair, e'er, elsewhere, ensnare, ere, extraordinaire, Eyre, fair, fare, fayre, Finisterre, flair, flare, Folies-Bergère, forbear, forswear, foursquare, glair, glare, hair, hare, heir, Herr, impair, jardinière, Khmer, Kildare, La Bruyère, lair, laissez-faire, legionnaire, luminaire, mal de mer, mare, mayor, meunière, mid-air, millionaire, misère, Mon-Khmer, multimillionaire, ne'er, Niger, nom de guerre, outstare, outwear, pair, pare, parterre, pear, père, pied-à-terre, Pierre, plein-air, prayer, questionnaire, rare, ready-to-wear, rivière, Rosslare, Santander, savoir faire, scare, secretaire, share, snare, solitaire, Soufrière, spare, square, stair, stare, surface-to-air, swear, Tailleferre, tare, tear, their, there, they're, vin ordinaire, Voltaire, ware, wear, Weston-super-Mare, where, yeah

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