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flake

flake1 / flāk/ • n. 1. a small, flat, thin piece of something, typically one that has broken away or been peeled off from a larger piece: paint peeling off the walls in unsightly flakes flakes of pastry. ∎  a snowflake. ∎  Archaeol. a piece of hard stone chipped off for use as a tool by prehistoric humans: [as adj.] flake tools. ∎  thin pieces of crushed dried food or bait for fish. 2. inf. a crazy or eccentric person. • v. 1. [intr.] come or fall away from a surface in thin pieces: the paint had been flaking off for years. ∎  lose small fragments from the surface: my nails have started to flake at the ends. 2. [tr.] break or divide (food) into thin pieces: flake the fish | [as adj.] (flaked) flaked haddock. ∎  [intr.] (of food, esp. when well cooked) come apart in thin pieces. flake2 • n. a rack or shelf for storing or drying food such as fish. flake3 • v. [intr.] (flake out) inf. fall asleep; drop from exhaustion. flake4 (also fake / fāk/ ) Naut. • n. a single turn of a coiled rope or hawser. • v. [tr.] lay (a rope) in loose coils in order to prevent it from tangling: a cable had to be flaked out. ∎  lay (a sail) down in folds on either side of the boom.

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flake

flake one of the small pieces in which snow falls XIV; piece of ignited matter thrown off XIV; flat or scaly fragment XV. immed. source(s) unkn.; cf. Norw. flak, flāk patch, flake, flake form into flakes, Sw. isflak ice-floe, ON. flakna flake off, split. Cf. FLAW1.
Hence vb. XV.

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Flake

Flake

a bundle of parallel fibres or threads, 1635.

Examples: flake of ice, 1555.

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flake

flakeache, awake, bake, betake, Blake, brake, break, cake, crake, drake, fake, flake, forsake, hake, Jake, lake, make, mistake, opaque, partake, quake, rake, sake, shake, sheikh, slake, snake, splake, stake, steak, strake, take, undertake, wake, wideawake •bellyache • clambake • headache •backache • pancake • teacake •seedcake • beefcake • cheesecake •fishcake • johnnycake • tipsy cake •rock cake • shortcake • oatcake •oilcake • fruitcake • cupcake •pat-a-cake • cornflake • snowflake •rattlesnake • handbrake • mandrake •heartbreak • airbrake • daybreak •jailbreak • canebrake • windbreak •tiebreak • corncrake • outbreak •footbrake • muckrake • earache •firebreak • namesake • keepsake •handshake • milkshake • heartache •beefsteak • sweepstake • stocktake •out-take • uptake • grubstake •wapentake • toothache • seaquake •kittiwake • moonquake • earthquake

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