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reverse

re·verse / riˈvərs/ • v. [intr.] move backward: the truck reversed into the back of a bus. ∎  [tr.] cause (a vehicle) to move backward: I got in the car, reversed it and drove it up the driveway. ∎  [tr.] turn (something) the other way around or up or inside out: [as adj.] (reversed) a reversed S-shape. ∎  [tr.] make (something) the opposite of what it was: the damage done to the ozone layer may be reversed. ∎  [tr.] exchange (the position or function) of two people or things: the experimenter and the subject reversed roles and the experiment was repeated. ∎  [tr.] Law revoke or annul (a judgment, sentence, or decree made by a lower court or authority): the court reversed his conviction. ∎  (of an engine) work in a contrary direction: the ship's engines reversed and cut out altogether. ∎  [tr.] Printing make (type or a design) print as white in a block of solid color or a halftone: their press ads had a headline reversed out of the illustration. • adj. going in or turned toward the direction opposite to that previously stated: the trend appears to be going in the reverse direction. ∎  operating, behaving, or ordered in a way contrary or opposite to that which is usual or expected: here are the results in reverse order. ∎  Electr. (of a voltage applied to a semiconductor junction) in the direction that does not allow significant current to flow. ∎  Geol. denoting a fault or faulting in which a relative downward movement occurred in the strata situated on the underside of the fault plane. • n. 1. a complete change of direction or action: the growth actuates a reverse of photosynthesis. ∎  reverse gear on a motor vehicle; the position of a gear lever or selector corresponding to this.See also in reverse below. ∎  (the reverse) the opposite or contrary to that previously stated: he didn't feel homesick—quite the reverse. ∎  an adverse change of fortune; a setback or defeat: the team suffered its heaviest reverse of the season. ∎  Football a play in which the ballcarrier reverses the direction of attack by lateraling or handling the ball to a teammate moving in the opposite direction. 2. the opposite side or face to the observer: the address is given on the reverse of this leaflet. ∎  a left-hand page of an open book, or the back of a loose document. ∎  the side of a coin or medal bearing the value or secondary design. ∎  the design or inscription on this side. See also obverse (sense 1). PHRASES: in (or into) reverse (of a motor vehicle) in reverse gear so as to travel backward: he put the Cadillac into reverse. ∎  in the opposite direction or manner from usual: a similar ride next year will do the route in reverse. reverse the charges make the recipient of a telephone call responsible for payment.DERIVATIVES: re·verse·ly adv. re·vers·er n.

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reverse

reverse opposite, contrary XIV (thereafter not till XVIII); mil. commanding the rear XVIII. — OF. revers(e) — L. reversus, -a, pp. of revertere turn back, etc., f. RE- + vertere turn.
So sb. A. contrary XIV (thereafter not till XVIII); back of a coin, etc. XVII. B. †back-handed stroke XV; adverse change of fortune XVI. — (O)F. revers or †reverse — sb. uses of the L. pp. reverse vb. (whence reversal (-AL2) XV) †bring, send, etc. back; †overthrow; invert, turn the other way. XIV. — OF. reverser (now ren-) — late L. reversāre. reversion (leg.) return of an estate; right of succession. XV. — (O)F. or L. revert †recover consciousness XIII; return, go back XIV. — OF. revertir or L. revertere.

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Reverse

REVERSE

To overthrow, invalidate, repeal, or revoke.

For example, an appeals court reverses the judgment, decree, or sentence of a lower court either by substituting its own decision or by returning the case to the lower court with instructions for a new trial.

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