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provocation

prov·o·ca·tion / ˌprävəˈkāshən/ • n. 1. action or speech that makes someone annoyed or angry, esp. deliberately: you should remain calm and not respond to provocation he burst into tears at the slightest provocation. ∎  Law action or speech held to be likely to prompt physical retaliation: the assault had taken place under provocation. 2. Med. testing to elicit a particular response or reflex: twenty patients had a high increase of serum gastrin after provocation with secretin.

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Provocation

PROVOCATION

Conduct by which one induces another to do a particular deed; the act of inducing rage, anger, or resentment in another person that may cause that person to engage in an illegal act.

Provocation may be alleged as a defense to certain crimes in order to lessen the severity of the penalty normally imposed. For example, provocation that would cause a reasonable person to act in a heat of passion—a state of mind where one acts without reflection—may result in a reduction of a charge of murder to a charge of voluntary manslaughter.

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