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fuse

fuse1 / fyoōz/ • n. a safety device consisting of a strip of wire that melts and breaks an electric circuit if the current exceeds a safe level. • v. 1. [tr.] join or blend to form a single entity: intermarriage had fused the families into a large unit. ∎  [intr.] (of groups of atoms or cellular structures) join or coalesce: the two nuclei move together and fuse into one nucleus. ∎  melt (a material or object) with intense heat, esp. so as to join it with something else: powdered glass was fused to a metal base. 2. [tr.] provide (a circuit or electrical appliance) with a fuse: [as adj.] (fused) a fused plug. PHRASES: blow a fuse use too much power in an electrical circuit, causing a fuse to melt. ∎ inf. lose one's temper: it was only a suggestion—there's no need to blow a fuse. fuse2 (also fuze) • n. a length of material along which a small flame moves to explode a bomb or firework, meanwhile allowing time for those who light it to move to a safe distance. ∎  a device in a bomb, shell, or mine that makes it explode on impact, after an interval, at set distance from the target, or when subjected to magnetic or vibratory stimulation. • v. [tr.] fit a fuse to (a bomb, shell, or mine): the bomb was fused to go off during a charity performance. PHRASES: light the (or a) fuse set something tense or exciting in motion: the event lit the fuse for the revolution. a short fuse a tendency to lose one's temper quickly: watch your tongue—he's got a very short fuse. ∎  (on a short fuse) likely to lose one's temper or explode. DERIVATIVES: fuse·less adj.

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fuse, electric

electric fuse, safety device used to protect an electric circuit against an excessive current. A fuse consists essentially of a strip of low-melting alloy enclosed in a suitable housing. It is connected in series with the circuit it is to protect. Because of its electrical resistance, the alloy strip in the fuse is heated by an electric current; if the current exceeds the safe value for which the fuse was designed, the strip melts, opening the circuit and stopping the current. The fuse housing is designed to resist the pressure generated if the overcurrent vaporizes the alloy strip, provided the voltage across the fuse does not exceed its rating. Some fuses, called slow-blow fuses, are designed to carry a small overload for a short time without opening the circuit, while others are designed to open very rapidly if the rated current is exceeded. The choice of one type or the other depends on the ruggedness of the equipment to be protected and whether large pulses of current often occur in the circuit; a slow-blow fuse is usually used to protect motors, and a fast-blow fuse to protect electronic equipment. A circuit can also be protected by a circuit breaker.

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fuse

fuse In electrical engineering, a safety device to protect against overloading. Fuses are commonly strips of easily melted metal placed in series in an electrical circuit such that when overloaded, the fuse melts, breaking the circuit and preventing systemic damage.

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fuse

fuse2 melt with intense heat. XVII. f. fūs-, pp. stem of L. fundere pour, melt, FOUND2.
So fusible capable of fusion. XIV (readopted XVII). — medL. fusile XIV. — L.

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fuse

fuse1, fuze cord, casing, etc., filled with combustible material for igniting explosive. XVII. — It. fuso :- L. fūsus spindle.

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fuse

fuseabuse, accuse, adieux, amuse, bemuse, billets-doux, blues, booze, bruise, choose, Clews, confuse, contuse, cruise, cruse, Cruz, diffuse, do's, Druze, effuse, enthuse, excuse, fuse (US fuze), Hughes, incuse, interfuse, lose, Mahfouz, mews, misuse, muse, news, ooze, Ouse, perfuse, peruse, rhythm-and-blues, ruse, schmooze, snooze, suffuse, Toulouse, transfuse, trews, use, Vaduz, Veracruz, who's, whose, youse •Andrews •Matthews • circumfuse • Syracuse •purlieux

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FUSE

FUSE Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer

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