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vis·it / ˈvizit/ • v. (-it·ed , -it·ing ) [tr.] 1. go to see and spend time with (someone) socially: I came to visit my grandmother. ∎  go to see and spend time in (a place) as a tourist. ∎  stay temporarily with (someone) or at (a place) as a guest: we hope you enjoy your stay and will visit us again | [intr.] I don't live here—I'm only visiting. ∎  go to see (someone or something) for a specific purpose, such as to make an inspection or to receive or give professional advice or help: inspectors visit all the hotels. ∎  [intr.] (visit with) go to see (someone) socially: he went out to visit with his pals. ∎  [intr.] inf. chat: there was nothing to do but visit with one another. ∎  go to (a Web site or Web page): visit us at www.flycreekcidermill.com. ∎  (chiefly in biblical use) (of God) come to (a person or place) in order to bring comfort or salvation. 2. (often be visited) inflict (something harmful or unpleasant) on someone: the mockery visited upon him by his schoolmates. ∎  (of something harmful or unpleasant) afflict (someone): they were visited with epidemics of a strange disease. ∎ archaic punish (a person or a wrongful act): offenses were visited with the loss of eyes or ears. • n. an act of going or coming to see a person or place socially, as a tourist, or for some other purpose: a visit to the doctor. ∎  a temporary stay with a person or at a place. ∎  an informal conversation. DERIVATIVES: vis·it·a·ble adj.ORIGIN: Middle English: from Old French visiter or Latin visitare ‘go to see,’ frequentative of visare ‘to view,’ from videre ‘to see.’

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visit

visit (of God) come to, in order to comfort or benefit; go to persons in sickness, etc. to comfort them; †make trial of XIII; deal severely with, assail, afflict XIV; punish, requite; go to see in a friendly way (attend as a physician XVI); go to in order to inspect, for worship, etc. — (O)F. visiter — L. vīsitāre go to see, frequent. of vīsāre view, see to, visit, f. vīs-, pp. stem of vidēre see (see prec.). The earlier uses are based on those of L. visitare in Vulg.
So visit sb. XVII. — F. visite, or immed. f. the vb. visitant XVI. — F. or L. visitation XIV. — (O)F. late L. visitatorial XVII. f. vīsitāt-, ppl. stem of L. vīsitāre. visitor XIV. — AN. visitour, (O)F. visiteur.

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visit

visit •davit • brevet • velvet • affidavit •civet, privet, rivet, trivet •private • covet • aquavit • banquet •halfwit • peewit • dimwit • nitwit •exquisite, visit •requisite • perquisite •closet, posit •apposite • opposite • composite

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