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resource

re·source / ˈrēˌsôrs; ˈrēˈzôrs; riˈsôrs; riˈzôrs/ • n. 1. (usu. resources) a stock or supply of money, materials, staff, and other assets that can be drawn on by a person or organization in order to function effectively: local authorities complained that they lacked resources. ∎  (resources) a country's collective means of supporting itself or becoming wealthier, as represented by its reserves of minerals, land, and other assets. ∎  (resources) available assets. 2. an action or strategy that may be adopted in adverse circumstances: sometimes anger is the only resource left in a situation like this. ∎  (resources) one's personal attributes and capabilities regarded as able to help or sustain one in adverse circumstances: we had been left very much to our own resources. ∎  the ability to find quick and clever ways to overcome difficulties: a man of resource. ∎  a teaching aid. ∎ archaic the possibility of aid or assistance: the flower of the French army was lost without resource. 3. archaic a leisure occupation. • v. [tr.] provide (a person or organization) with materials, money, staff, and other assets necessary for effective operation: ensuring that primary health care workers are adequately resourced. DERIVATIVES: re·source·less adj. re·source·less·ness n.

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resource

resource Any of the component parts of a computer system and the facilities that it offers. All computer systems must include one or more processors, which actually manipulate the stored information, some form of memory in which to store both instructions for the processors and data awaiting manipulation, and input/output devices capable of reading information from the outside world and writing results to the outside world.

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resource

resource XVII. — F. ressource, †-ourse, sb. use of fem. pp. of OF. (dial.) resourdre rise again, recover:- L. resurgere.

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