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request

re·quest / riˈkwest/ • n. an act of asking politely or formally for something: a request for information the club's excursion was postponed at the request of some of the members. ∎  a thing that is asked for: to have our ideas taken seriously is surely a reasonable request. ∎  an instruction to a computer to provide information or perform another function. ∎  a tune or song played on a radio program, in some instances accompanied by a personal message, in response to a letter or call asking for it. ∎ archaic the state of being sought after: human intelligence, which is in constant request in a family. • v. [tr.] politely or formally ask for: he received the information he had requested | the chairman requested that the reports be considered. ∎  politely ask (someone) to do something: the letter requested him to report to New York immediately. PHRASES: by (or on) request in response to an expressed wish.DERIVATIVES: re·quest·er n.

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request

request sb. XIV. — OF. requeste :- Rom. *requæsita, sb. use of fem. pp. of L. requærere REQUIRE.
So vb. XVI. f. the sb. or — OF. requester.

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"request." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved April 25, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/request-0

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