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KEYWORD

KEYWORD, also key word.
1. A WORD that serves as a crucial (‘key’) element in a usage, phrase, sentence, text, subject, concept, theory, or language: Keywords: A Vocabulary of Culture and Society, by Raymond Williams (Fontana/Croom Helm, 1976), a work in the form of a glossary of such words as alienation, career, empirical, fiction, humanity, nationalist, and science, described in the introduction as ‘the record of an inquiry into a vocabulary: a shared body of words and meanings in our most general discussion, in English, of the practices and institutions which we group as culture and society’
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2. A significant word for a person or group: ‘Self-reliance and self-care were the keywords’ ( Mary Kenny, ‘Paying the Price of Feminism’, Sunday Telegraph, 6 Nov. 1988)
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3. A technical term for a term in a list through which it is possible to search an index, catalogue, filing system, or electronic database
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4. Also CATCHWORD. A term in library science for a memorable or important word or term in the title, text, or abstract of an item being indexed and therefore used in the index entry
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5. A term in cryptography for a word that is crucial in the enciphering or deciphering of a coded message.

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"KEYWORD." Concise Oxford Companion to the English Language. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Nov. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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keyword

key·word / ˈkēˌwərd/ • n. a word or concept of great significance: homes and jobs are the keywords in the campaign. ∎  a word that acts as the key to a cipher or code. ∎  an informative word used in an information retrieval system to indicate the content of a document. ∎  a significant word mentioned in an index.

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"keyword." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Nov. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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keyword

keyword A symbol in a programming language that has a special meaning for the compiler or interpreter. For example, keywords in Basic include IF, THEN, PRINT. The keywords guide the analysis of the language, and in a simple language each keyword causes activation of a specific routine in the language processor. See also keyword parameter, reserved word.

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keyword

keywordabsurd, bird, Byrd, curd, engird, gird, Heard, herd, Kurd, misheard, nerd, overheard, reheard, third, turd, undergird, undeterred, unheard, unstirred, word •blackbird • yardbird • cage bird •jailbird • seabird • ladybird •dickybird • mockingbird • whirlybird •hummingbird • nightbird • songbird •shorebird • bluebird • lovebird •lyrebird • bowerbird • thunderbird •waterbird • weaverbird • Sigurd •swineherd • cowherd • goatherd •potsherd • catchword • password •headword • swear word • keyword •byword • watchword • crossword •foreword • loanword • buzzword •afterword

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"keyword." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Nov. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

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American Psychological Association

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Notes:
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