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hood

hood1 / hoŏd/ • n. 1. a covering for the head and neck with an opening for the face, typically forming part of a coat or sweatshirt. ∎  a separate garment similar to this worn over a college gown or a surplice to indicate the wearer's degree. ∎  Falconry a leather covering for a hawk's head. 2. a thing resembling a hood in shape or use, in particular: ∎  a metal part covering the engine of an automobile. ∎  a canopy to protect users of machinery or to remove fumes from it. ∎  a hoodlike structure or marking on the head or neck of an animal. ∎  the upper part of the flower of a plant such as a dead-nettle. ∎  a tubular attachment to keep stray light out of a camera lens: a lens hood. ∎ Brit. a folding waterproof cover of an automobile, baby carriage, etc. • v. [tr.] put a hood on or over. DERIVATIVES: hood·less adj. hood·like / -ˌlīk/ adj. hood2 • n. inf. a gangster or similar violent criminal. hood3 (also 'hood) • n. inf. a neighborhood, esp. one's own neighborhood: I've lived in the hood for 15 years.

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HOOD

HOOD Acronym for hierarchical object-oriented design. HOOD was developed specifically for the European Space Agency and very closely follows the structure of the Ada programming language. It provides diagram notations to depict nested packages and tasks; it also provides specification of these items in terms of procedures, functions, variables, types, etc. It indicates how higher-level objects are decomposed into lower-level objects and also how the interface of the high-level object is mapped to the interface(s) of lower-level objects.

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hood

hood.
1. Projecting cover to a fireplace to increase the draught and remove smoke, attached to the wall behind.

2. Canopy or cover above an aperture, such as a doorway, to protect it from the weather.

3. Drip-stone or label over the heads of apertures, arched or rectangular, usually with label-stops at each end.

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hood

hood OE. hōd = MDu. hoet (Du. hoed), OHG. huot (G. hut hat) :- WGmc. *χōda, rel. to HAT.
Hence hoodwink cover the eyes to prevent vision XVI; fig. XVII.

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hood

hoodcould, good, hood, Likud, misunderstood, pud, should, stood, understood, withstood, wood, would •Gielgud • manhood • maidenhood •nationhood • statehood • sainthood •priesthood • kinghood • babyhood •likelihood • livelihood • puppyhood •childhood • wifehood • knighthood •falsehood • widowhood • boyhood •cousinhood • adulthood •neighbourhood (US neighborhood) •husbandhood • bachelorhood •toddlerhood • womanhood •parenthood • sisterhood •spinsterhood • fatherhood •brotherhood, motherhood •girlhood • Talmud • Malamud •matchwood • Dagwood • Blackwood •sandalwood • sapwood • basswood •Atwood •Harewood, Larwood •hardwood • lancewood • heartwood •redwood • Wedgwood • Elmwood •bentwood • Hailwood • lacewood •beechwood • greenwood • Eastwood •cheesewood • driftwood • stinkwood •Littlewood • giltwood • Hollywood •satinwood • plywood • wildwood •pinewood • whitewood • softwood •dogwood, logwood •cottonwood • coachwood • rosewood •fruitwood • Goodwood • brushwood •firewood • ironwood • underwood •Isherwood • wormwood

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HOOD

HOOD (hʊd) Computing hierarchical object-oriented design

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