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cool

cool / koōl/ • adj. 1. of or at a fairly low temperature. ∎  soothing or refreshing because of its low temperature: a cool drink fig. the bathroom was all cool, muted blues. ∎  (esp. of clothing) keeping one from becoming too hot: cool, comfortable shirts. ∎  showing no friendliness toward a person or enthusiasm for an idea or project: he gave a cool reception to the suggestion. ∎  free from excitement or anxiety: he prided himself on keeping a cool head. ∎  calmly audacious: such an expensive strategy requires cool nerves. ∎  (of jazz, esp. modern jazz) restrained and relaxed. 2. inf. fashionably attractive or impressive: I always wore sunglasses to look cool. ∎  excellent: [as interj.] a computer you didn't even have to plug in. Cool! 3. (a cool ——) inf. used to emphasize a specified quantity or amount, esp. of money: a cool $15,000 to buy the franchise. • n. 1. (the cool) a fairly low temperature: the cool of the night air. ∎  a time or place at which the temperature is pleasantly low: the cool of the evening. ∎  calmness; composure. 2. the quality of being fashionably attractive or impressive: all the cool of high fashion. • v. become or cause to become less hot: [intr.] we dived into the river to cool off | fig. his feelings for her took a long time to cool | [tr.] cool the pastry for five minutes. ∎  become or cause to become calm or less excited: [intr.] after I'd cooled off, I realized I was being irrational | [tr.] George was trying to cool him down. ∎  [usu. in imper.] (cool it) inf. behave in a less excitable manner: “Cool it and tell me why you're so ecstatic.” PHRASES: cool one's heels be kept waiting. keep (or lose) one's cool inf. maintain (or fail to maintain) a calm and controlled attitude. play it coolsee play.DERIVATIVES: cooled adj. cool·ish adj. cool·ly adv. cool·ness n.

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cool

cool cool as a cucumber completely calm; the term is recorded from the mid 18th century.
Cool Britannia Britain, perceived as a stylish and fashionable place; especially (in the late 1990s) as represented by the international success of and interest in contemporary British art, popular music, film, and fashion.

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cool

cool adj. OE. cōl = MLG., MDu. kōl (Du. koel) :- Gmc. *kōluz, f. *kōl- *kal- (see COLD); as sb. from XIV.
Hence cool vb. OE. cōlian = OS. cōlon :- Gmc. *kōlōjan, f. *kōluz.

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cool

coolBanjul, befool, Boole, boule, boules, boulle, cagoule, cool, drool, fool, ghoul, Joule, mewl, misrule, mule, O'Toole, pool, Poole, pul, pule, Raoul, rule, school, shul, sool, spool, Stamboul, stool, Thule, tomfool, tool, tulle, you'll, yule •mutule • kilojoule • playschool •intercool • Blackpool •ampoule (US ampule) • cesspool •Hartlepool • Liverpool • whirlpool •ferrule, ferule •curule • cucking-stool • faldstool •toadstool • footstool • animalcule •granule • capsule • ridicule • molecule •minuscule • fascicule • graticule •vestibule • reticule • globule •module, nodule •floccule • noctule • opuscule •pustule • majuscule • virgule

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