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magnesia (chemical compound)

magnesia, common name for the chemical compound magnesium oxide, MgO. It occurs as colorless, cubic crystals. It is refractory, melting at about 2,800°C. It is very slightly soluble in pure water but is soluble in acids and solutions of ammonium salts. The magnesia of commerce is a fine white powder used in soaps, cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, and as a filler in rubber goods. Magnesia is used to make crucibles and other ceramic goods. Crude magnesia is prepared by roasting dolomite (calcium magnesium double carbonate) or magnesite (magnesium carbonate). Pure magnesia is prepared by refining the crude product. Magnesia is also extracted from seawater. It occurs in nature as the mineral periclase.

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magnesia

magnesia
A. †(alch.) mineral ingredient of the philosopher's stone XIV;

B. †(spec. black m.) manganese XVII;

C. (spec. †white m.) hydrated magnesium carbonate, used medicinally; (chem.) magnesium oxide XVIII. — medL. magnēsia — Gr. (hē) Magnēsía (líthos) ‘the Magnesian stone’, (1) loadstone, (2) stone with silvery sheen; the development of senses B and C is obscure.
Hence magnesium XIX.

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magnesia

magnesia Magnesium oxide (MgO), a white, neutral, stable powder formed when magnesium is burned in oxygen. It is used industrially in firebrick and medicinally in stomach powders. Magnesium carbonate, found as magnesite and also used as an antacid, is often called magnesia.

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magnesia

mag·ne·sia / magˈnēzhə; -ˈnēshə/ • n. Chem. magnesium oxide, MgO. ∎  hydrated magnesium carbonate used as an antacid and laxative.

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magnesia

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