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Ball-of-Light International Data Exchange (BOLIDE)

Ball-of-Light International Data Exchange (BOLIDE)

A now-defunct project that shared and disseminated information relating to balls of light, with a wide scope of inquiry including ball-lightning, marsh lights, will o' the wisp, and séance room phenomena. The project coordinator was Hilary Evans, a British authority on such subjects as apparitions, visions, UFOs, and alien visitors. BOLIDE circulated data supplied by contributorsarticles found in scholarly journals, press clippings, private research reports from groups or individuals, or personal speculations and hypothesis. Such data was sent to subscribers who paid only the cost of copying and mailing. BOLIDE may still be contacted c/o Hilary Evans, 59 Tranquil Vale, London SE3 OBU, England.

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bolide

bolide Large meteor that explodes in passing through the Earth's atmosphere. The term is sometimes used synonymously with fire-ball, but some people reserve ‘bolide’ for an exploding meteor, and ‘fire-ball’ for a less-bright object.

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bolide

bolide: see fireball.

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bolide

bolideabide, applied, aside, astride, backslide, beside, bestride, betide, bide, bride, chide, Clyde, cockeyed, coincide, collide, confide, cried, decide, divide, dried, elide, five-a-side, glide, guide, hide, hollow-eyed, I'd, implied, lied, misguide, nationwide, nide, offside, onside, outride, outside, pan-fried, pied, pie-eyed, popeyed, pride, provide, ride, Said, shied, side, slide, sloe-eyed, snide, square-eyed, starry-eyed, statewide, Strathclyde, stride, subdivide, subside, tide, tried, undyed, wall-eyed, wide, worldwide •carbide • unmodified •overqualified, unqualified •dignified, signified •unverified • countrified •unpurified • unclassified •unspecified • sissified • unsanctified •self-satisfied, unsatisfied •unidentified • unquantified •unfortified • unjustified • uncertified •formaldehyde • oxhide • rawhide •cowhide • allied • landslide • bolide •paraglide • polyamide • bromide •thalidomide • selenide • cyanide •unoccupied

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