Holaind, René

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HOLAIND, RENÉ

Educator, author; b. Moulins, France, July 27, 1836;d. Woodstock, Md., April 20, 1906. He entered the Jesuit novitiate at Avignon, France, in 1851 and taught at Avignon and Dôle, France, before immigrating to the U.S. in 1861. After theological studies at Boston College, Mass., and Spring Hill College, Mobile, Ala., he taught for 13 years at Jesuit schools in Alabama and Louisiana and for five years was a parish priest at Selma, Ala. He was professor of ethics at Woodstock College, Wood-stock, Md., from 1885 until 1898. After a brief time as a chaplain with the U.S. Army, he taught ethics and jurisprudence at Georgetown University, Washington, D.C., until he retired to Woodstock in 1905. Holaind's interests included music, architecture, and the classics of ancient and modern literature. He published a defense of the right of private property, Ownership and Natural Right (1887), and a textbook on jurisprudence, Natural Law and Legal Practice (1889). During the Catholic controversy in the 1890s over the role of public and parochial schools, he opposed the party led by Abp. John Ireland (see fari bault plan). His strong defense of parochial schools, The Parent First (1891), was probably written at the suggestion of Ireland's opponent, Abp. Michael A. Corrigan of New York. Holaind's critics, condemning his pamphlet as reactionary and attuned to the situation in Europe rather than to American conditions, generally sided with Thomas J. bouquillon of The Catholic University of America, Washington, D.C., who defended the rights of the state in education.

Bibliography: p. j. dooley, Woodstock and Its Makers (Woodstock, Md. 1927). j. t. ellis, The Life of James Cardinal Gibbons, 2 v. (Milwaukee 1952) 1:653707.

[j. j. hennesey]

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Holaind, René

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