Brady, Ignatius Charles

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BRADY, IGNATIUS CHARLES

Franciscan philosopher; b. May 9, 1911, Detroit, Michigan; d. Aug. 4, 1990, Cincinnati, Ohio. Charles Brady was the oldest son of five children of Hubert John Brady and Agnes McSweeney. Both his parents were children of Irish immigrants from Counties Cavin and Clare. Charles entered the Friars Minor in 1929 when he was given the religious name, Ignatius, and in 1937 he was ordained to the priesthood. The following year Brady began graduate studies at the Pontifical Institute of Medieval Studies, Toronto, Canada, where in 1940 he received a Master of Arts Degree, in 1941 a Licentiate in Medieval Studies, and in 1948 a Doctorate in Philosophy. He began teaching at Duns Scotus College, Southfield, Michigan (19421952), then at Mary Grove College, Detroit, Michigan (19451946), St. Francis College, Ft. Wayne, Indiana (19551956), and the Catholic University of America, Washington, D.C. (19591961).

In 1956, Brady joined the research center of the Friars Minor at Collegio San Bonaventura, Quarrachi, Italy. Five years later the friars appointed him prefect of the center's theological section. In that role, he helped lay the solid foundation for a renewal of Franciscan spirituality after the Second Vatican Council. His enormous literary output covered a variety of subjects, from the writings of Saints Francis and Clare of Assisi to those of Saint Bonaventure and Blessed Duns Scotus. The later years of his life were devoted to the critical edition of the writings of Peter Lombard. Brady spent every summer at the Franciscan Institute of St. Bonaventure University, and preached and traveled extensively in the promotion of Franciscan values.

He died at St. Clare Retirement Community in Cincinnati, Ohio, after a long struggle with illness. To generations of Franciscans from all branches of that family, he was living witness to the wisdom, humility, and graciousness of their founder.

[r. j. armstrong]

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