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Diplura

Diplura An order of small to medium-sized wingless insects, sometimes known as 'two-pronged bristletails', with elongated bodies, prominent paired tail-like cerci, and slender paired antennae. There are some 800 known species, typically 2–5 mm long, exceptionally reaching 50 mm. They lack eyes, have partially concealed mouthparts, and are found in dark humid places, for example in soil or under bark, living mostly on decaying vegetation, although some species are predators. The number of body segments is fixed during development, and moulting continues throughout life. Although some authorities place the Diplura in the subclass Apterygota, with the other wingless insects, others regard them as a separate class within the superclass Hexapoda.

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Diplura

Diplura (subphylum Atelocerata, class Insecta) A subclass of small (mostly 6 mm long or smaller), elongate, slender, whitish, blind, entognathous insects. They have long, moniliform antennae, legs that are five-segmented, and abdomens that are ten-segmented and bear rudimentary limbs. There are two main families: the vegetarian Campodeidae, in which the abdomen bears long, moniliform cerci; and the carnivorous Japygidae, in which the cerci are short and forcep-like. Post-embryonic development is epimorphic. The Diplura form a cosmopolitan order of some 659 species, found world-wide, whose members are the most insect-like of the entognathous classes and live in damp soil, under stones or logs.

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