Cell hybridization

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cell fusion (somatic cell hybridization) The technique of combining two cells from different tissues or species in a cell culture. The cells are fused (see chemical fusogen) and coalesce but their nuclei generally remain separate. However, during cell division a single spindle is formed so that each daughter cell has a single nucleus containing sets of chromosomes from each parental line. Subsequent division of the hybrid cells often results in the loss of chromosomes (and therefore genes), so that absence of a gene product in the culture can be related to the loss of a particular chromosome. Thus the technique is used to determine the control of characteristics exerted by specific chromosomes. Hybrid cells (see hybridoma) resulting from cell fusion have also been used to produce monoclonal antibodies.

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cell fusion The experimental fusion of nuclei and cytoplasm from different somatic cells to form a single hybrid cell. Cells used for fusion often come from tissue cultures derived from different species: fusion is facilitated by the modification of the surface of cells by adsorption of certain viruses (e.g. Sendai virus).

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cell fusion The experimental fusion of nuclei and cytoplasm from different somatic cells to form a single hybrid cell. Cells used for fusion often come from tissue cultures derived from different species; fusion is facilitated by the modification of the surface of cells by adsorption of certain viruses (e.g. Sendai virus).