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phlox

phlox, common name for plants of the genus Phlox and for members of the Polemoniaceae, a family of herbs (and some shrubs and vines) found chiefly in the W United States. The family includes many popular wild and garden flowers, especially the genera Phlox, Polemonium (called Jacob's ladder), and Gilia, a plant common in desert and mountain areas. Although most phloxes are perennial, the common garden phloxes are annual hybrids of the Texas species Phlox drummondii. The moss pink (Phlox subulata) is a creeping evergreen plant native to the E United States and often cultivated in rock gardens. A few species of phlox and polemonium are found in E Asia. The phlox family is classified in the division Magnoliophyta, class Magnoliopsida, order Polemoniales.

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phlox

phlox / fläks/ • n. a North American plant (genus Phlox, family Polemoniaceae) that typically has dense clusters of colorful scented flowers, widely grown as a rock-garden or border plant.

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phlox

phlox herbaceous plant. XVIII. — L. — Gr. phlóx lit. flame, f. *phlog- *phleg- :- IE. *bhleg- (cf. FLAGRANT).

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Phlox

Phlox See POLEMONIACEAE.

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phlox

phloxbox, cox, detox, fox, Foxe, Knox, lox, outfox, ox, phlox, pox, Stocks •matchbox •bandbox, sandbox •hatbox • haybox • mailbox • brainbox •paintbox • squeezebox • pillbox •icebox • strongbox • horsebox •saltbox • soundbox • soapbox •shadow-box • shoebox • jukebox •toolbox • snuffbox • gearbox • firebox •tinderbox • thunderbox • pillar box •pepperbox • chatterbox • letter box •workbox • paradox • heterodox •orthodox • dementia praecox •Wilcox • backblocks • dreadlocks •Goldilocks • Magnox • equinox •chickenpox • smallpox • cowpox •aurochs • xerox • volvox •Faux, Fawkes •Boaks, coax, hoax, Oaks, stokes •yoicks •Fuchs, gadzooks, Jukes •Brooks, Crookes

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Phlox

Phlox

Phloxes (Phlox spp.) are a group of about 50 species of flowering plants in the family Polemoniaceae, which contains about 300 species in total.

Phloxes are herbaceous plants with bright, showy flowers. Each flower has five red, pink, or white petals that are fused at their bases to form a tube, but remain separate at the top of the structure. These flowers are arranged in very attractive groups, known as an inflorescence. Phloxes are pollinated by long-tongued insects, and in some places by hummingbirds.

Many species of phlox are commonly cultivated in gardens as ornamentals, such as gilias (Gilia spp.) and Jacobs-ladder (Polemonium spp.). Among the more commonly grown herbaceous, perennial phloxes are the garden phlox (Phlox paniculata ), sweet-William (P. maculata ), and hybrids of these and other species. Drummonds pink (Phlox drummondii ) is an annual that is commonly used as a bedding plant.

The natural habitats of many species of phlox are arctic and alpine environments, and some of these species do well in rock gardens. The moss pink (Phlox subulata ) is commonly cultivated in this way.

Most species of phloxes are not cultivated, but their beauty as wildflowers can be appreciated in their native habitats. The wild blue phlox (Phlox divaricata ) is a familiar species in moist woodlands over much of eastern North America, while the downy phlox (P. pilosa ) is widespread in natural prairies over much of the continent.

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Phlox

Phlox

Phloxes (Phlox spp.) are a group of about 50 species of flowering plants in the family Polemoniaceae, which contains about 300 species in total.

Phloxes are herbaceous plants with bright, showy flowers. Each flower has five red, pink, or white petals that are fused at their bases to form a tube, but remain separate at the top of the structure. These flowers are arranged in very attractive groups, known as an inflorescence. Phloxes are pollinated by long-tongued insects , and in some places by hummingbirds .

Many species of phlox are commonly cultivated in gardens as ornamentals, such as gilias (Gilia spp.) and Jacob's-ladder (Polemonium spp.). Among the more commonly grown herbaceous, perennial phloxes are the garden phlox (Phlox paniculata), sweet-William (P. maculata), and hybrids of these and other species. Drummond's pink (Phlox drummondii) is an annual that is commonly used as a bedding plant .

The natural habitats of many species of phlox are arctic and alpine environments, and some of these species do well in rock gardens. The moss pink (Phlox subulata) is commonly cultivated in this way.

Most species of phloxes are not cultivated, but their beauty as wildflowers can be appreciated in their native habitats. The wild blue phlox (Phlox divaricata) is a familiar species in moist woodlands over much of eastern North America , while the downy phlox (P. pilosa) is widespread in natural prairies over much of the continent .

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