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pea

pea, hardy, annual, climbing leguminous plant (Pisum sativum) of the family Leguminosae (pulse family), grown for food by humans at least since the early Bronze Age; no longer known in the wild form. It is cultivated everywhere in home gardens and on a large scale commercially for freezing or canning. The round seed, borne in a pod, is a highly nutritious food, having a high protein and fiber content. The pod, too, of the varieties known as sugar peas, can be eaten, and the whole plant is grown for forage; the vines of garden varieties are also used for feeding stock. In New England many gardeners plant them on Apr. 19, the anniversary of the battle of Lexington—hoping to have their first peas by the Fourth of July, when according to traditional use they accompany salmon on the menu. Split peas are obtained from the field pea (var. arvense), grown also for forage and as a green manure. About three quarters of the total world crop of the field pea variety is grown in China; much is used for stock feed. It is believed that peas were long grown only for use as pea meal, dried peas, or forage. Using peas as a green table vegetable began in the late Middle Ages, and the garden varieties were developed subsequently. The garden pea is renowned as the plant with which Gregor Mendel conducted the experiments that initiated the science of genetics. The chickpea and the sweet pea belong to different genera. Peas are classified in the division Magnoliophyta, class Magnoliopsida, order Rosales, family Leguminosae.

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pea

pea / / • n. 1. a spherical green seed that is widely eaten as a vegetable. ∎  any of a number of edible spherical seeds of the pea family, e.g., chickpea and black-eyed pea. 2. the widely cultivated Eurasian climbing plant (Pisum sativum) that yields pods containing these seeds. The pea family (Leguminosae, or Fabaceae) is sometimes divided among three smaller families: Papilionaceae (peas, beans, clovers, vetches, brooms, laburnums), Mimosaceae (mimosas, acacias), and Caesalpiniaceae (cassia, carob, and many tropical timber trees). ∎  used in names of other plants of this family that yield round seeds or have flowers resembling those of the pea, e.g., sweet pea. PHRASES: like peas (or two peas) in a pod so similar as to be indistinguishable or nearly so.

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pea

pea Climbing annual plant (Pisum sativum), probably native to w Asia. It has small oval leaves and white flowers that give rise to pods containing wrinkled or smooth seeds. The seeds are a popular vegetable. It grows to 1.8m (6ft). Family Fabaceae/Leguminosae.

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pea

pea
1.. (garden pea) See PISUM.

2.. (wild pea, sweet pea) See LATHYRUS.

3.. (Sturt's desert pea) See CLIANTHUS.

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pea

pea (round seed of) the plant Pisum sativum. XVII. Evolved as if a sg. from PEASE apprehended as a pl.

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pea

peaabsentee, addressee, adoptee, agree, allottee, amputee, appellee, appointee, appraisee, après-ski, assignee, attendee, bailee, bain-marie, Bangui, bargee, bawbee, be, Bea, bee, bootee, bouquet garni, bourgeoisie, Brie, BSc, buckshee, Capri, cc, chimpanzee, cohabitee, conferee, consignee, consultee, Cree, debauchee, decree, dedicatee, Dee, degree, deportee, dernier cri, detainee, devisee, devotee, divorcee, draftee, dree, Dundee, dungaree, eau-de-vie, emcee, employee, endorsee, en famille, ennui, enrollee, escapee, esprit, evacuee, examinee, expellee, fee, fiddle-de-dee, flea, flee, fleur-de-lis, foresee, franchisee, free, fusee (US fuzee), Gardaí, garnishee, gee, ghee, glee, goatee, grandee, Grand Prix, grantee, Guarani, guarantee, he, indictee, inductee, internee, interviewee, invitee, jamboree, Jaycee, jeu d'esprit, key, knee, Lea, lee, legatee, Leigh, lessee, Ley, licensee, loanee, lychee, manatee, Manichee, maquis, Marie, marquee, me, Midi, mortgagee, MSc, nominee, obligee, Otomi, parolee, Parsee, parti pris, patentee, Pawnee, payee, pea, pee, permittee, plc, plea, pledgee, pollee, presentee, promisee, quay, ratatouille, referee, refugee, releasee, repartee, retiree, returnee, rupee, scot-free, scree, sea, secondee, see, settee, Shanxi, Shawnee, shchi, she, shea, si, sirree, ski, spree, standee, suttee, tant pis, tea, tee, tee-hee, Tennessee, testee, the, thee, three, thuggee, Tiree, Torquay, trainee, Tralee, transferee, tree, Trincomalee, trustee, tutee, twee, Twi, undersea, vestee, vis-à-vis, wagon-lit, Waikiki, warrantee, we, wee, whee, whoopee, ye, yippee, Zuider Zee

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PEA

PEA Physical Education Association of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

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