Skip to main content
Select Source:

duckweed

duckweed, any plant of the genus Lemna and sometimes of related genera. Duckweeds are tiny floating or submerged aquatic plants with reduced or obsolete roots. They flower only rarely, and their flowers are small and inconspicuous. Duckweeds grow in freshwater throughout most of the world. They are classified in the division Magnoliophyta, class Liliopsida, order Arales, family Lemnaceae.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"duckweed." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Nov. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"duckweed." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 17, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/duckweed

"duckweed." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved November 17, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/duckweed

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

duckweed

duck·weed / ˈdəkˌwēd/ • n. a tiny aquatic flowering plant (family Lemnaceae, esp. the genus Lemna) that floats in large quantities on still water.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"duckweed." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Nov. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"duckweed." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 17, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/duckweed-0

"duckweed." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved November 17, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/duckweed-0

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

duckweed

duckweed Family (Lemnaceae) of four genera including 25 species of tiny, floating, aquatic flowering plants. The disc-like leaflets have a single 15cm (6in) trailing root.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"duckweed." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Nov. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"duckweed." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 17, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/duckweed

"duckweed." World Encyclopedia. . Retrieved November 17, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/duckweed

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

duckweed

duckweed See LEMNACEAE.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"duckweed." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Nov. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"duckweed." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 17, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/duckweed

"duckweed." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Retrieved November 17, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/science/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/duckweed

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

duckweed

duckweedaccede, bead, Bede, bleed, breed, cede, concede, creed, deed, Eid, exceed, feed, Gide, God speed, greed, he'd, heed, impede, interbreed, intercede, Jamshid, knead, lead, mead, Mede, meed, misdeed, mislead, misread, need, plead, proceed, read, rede, reed, Reid, retrocede, screed, secede, seed, she'd, speed, stampede, steed, succeed, supersede, Swede, tweed, weak-kneed, we'd, weed •breastfeed • greenfeed • dripfeed •chickenfeed • spoonfeed • nosebleed •Nibelungenlied • invalid • Ganymede •Runnymede • airspeed • millipede •velocipede • centipede • Siegfried •filigreed • copyread • crossbreed •proofread • flaxseed • hayseed •rapeseed • linseed • pumpkinseed •aniseed • oilseed • birdseed • ragweed •knapweed • seaweed • chickweed •stinkweed • blanket weed • bindweed •pondweed • duckweed • tumbleweed •fireweed • waterweed • silverweed

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"duckweed." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Nov. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"duckweed." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 17, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/duckweed

"duckweed." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved November 17, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/duckweed

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

Duckweed

Duckweed

Duckweeds are small, floating to slightly submerged species of flowering plants in the genus Lemna. The simple body is leaflike, generally flat on top and convex below, lacks stems or leaves, is oval to tear-drop in shape, and has one unbranched root that lacks vascular (conducting) tissue. The upper surface of the plant is covered with waxy compounds so as to shed water.

Duckweeds are abundant throughout the world in freshwater ponds, lakes, and backwaters where the water is still, with the exception of the Arctic. Plants range in size from 0.05-0.8 inches (1.5-20 mm) in length. One of the most widely distributed species, Lemna minor, typically grows to a length of 0.05-0.15 inches (1.5-4 mm).

Reproduction in duckweeds is almost exclusively asexual, occurring as outgrowths from one end breaks off, often resulting in the development of a dense, green mat on the surface of the water. Individual bodies are generally short-lived, five to six weeks for Lemna minor. Sexual reproduction is rare in duckweeds, and appears to occur mostly in warmer regions. Flowers are unisexual and extremely simple, consisting of only one stamen in male and one pistil in female flowers. Each flower arises from a pouch in the body and is covered by a small, highly modified leaf called a spathe.

The watermeal (Wolffia ) is a close relative of duckweed, and is the smallest flowering plant. Some species of watermeal consist of only a globular, rootless body, as small as 0.02 inches (0.5 mm). Duckweeds and watermeals are an important food for waterfowl, which feed on these plants on the water surface.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Duckweed." The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Nov. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Duckweed." The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 17, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/science/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/duckweed

"Duckweed." The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. . Retrieved November 17, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/science/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/duckweed

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

Duckweed

Duckweed

Duckweeds are small, floating to slightly submerged species of flowering plants in the genus Lemna. The simple body is leaf-like, generally flat on top and convex below, lacks stems or leaves, is oval to tear-dropped in shape, and has one unbranched root that lacks vascular (conducting) tissue . The upper surface of the plant is covered with waxy compounds so as to shed water .

Duckweeds are abundant throughout the world in freshwater ponds, lakes, and backwaters where the water is still, with the exception of the Arctic. Plants range in size from 0.05-0.8 in (1.5-20 mm) in length. One of the most widely distributed species, Lemna minor, typically grows to a length of 0.05-0.15 in (1.5-4 mm).

Reproduction in duckweeds is almost exclusively asexual, occurring as outgrowths from one end breaks off, often resulting in the development of a dense, green mat on the surface of the water. Individual bodies are generally short-lived, five to six weeks for Lemna minor. Sexual reproduction is rare in duckweeds, and appears to occur mostly in warmer regions. Flowers are unisexual and extremely simple, consisting of only one stamen in male and one pistil in female flowers. Each flower arises from a pouch in the body and is covered by a small, highly modified leaf called a spathe.

The watermeal (Wolffia) is a close relative of duckweed, and is the smallest flowering plant. Some species of watermeal consist of only a globular, rootless body, as small as 0.02 in (0.5 mm). Duckweeds and watermeals are an important food for waterfowl, which feed on these plants on the water surface.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Duckweed." The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. . Encyclopedia.com. 17 Nov. 2018 <https://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Duckweed." The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. . Encyclopedia.com. (November 17, 2018). https://www.encyclopedia.com/science/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/duckweed-0

"Duckweed." The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. . Retrieved November 17, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/science/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/duckweed-0

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.