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heartwood

heartwood, the central, woody core of a tree, no longer serving for the conduction of water and dissolved minerals; heartwood is usually denser and darker in color than the outer sapwood. Before the synthesis of aniline dyes, the heartwood of several tropical trees (sold collectively under the commercial name brazilwood) was used to produce blue, purple, and red dyes. As a tree becomes older, the heartwood increases in diameter, whereas the sapwood remains about the same thickness. See wood.

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heartwood

heartwood (duramen) The wood at the centre of a tree trunk or branch. It consists of dead xylem cells heavily thickened with lignin and provides structural support. Many heartwood cells contain oils, gums, and resins, which darken the wood. Compare sapwood.

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heartwood

heartwood The dead, woody centre of the trunk of a tree. The cells become impregnated with various organic compounds which cause a change in colour, so that this tissue is distinguished easily from the remainder of the wood.

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heartwood

heartwood The dead, woody centre of the trunk of a tree. The cells become impregnated with various organic compounds which cause a change in colour, so that this tissue is distinguished easily from the remainder of the wood.

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"heartwood." A Dictionary of Plant Sciences. . Encyclopedia.com. 21 Apr. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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heartwood

heartwoodcould, good, hood, Likud, misunderstood, pud, should, stood, understood, withstood, wood, would •Gielgud • manhood • maidenhood •nationhood • statehood • sainthood •priesthood • kinghood • babyhood •likelihood • livelihood • puppyhood •childhood • wifehood • knighthood •falsehood • widowhood • boyhood •cousinhood • adulthood •neighbourhood (US neighborhood) •husbandhood • bachelorhood •toddlerhood • womanhood •parenthood • sisterhood •spinsterhood • fatherhood •brotherhood, motherhood •girlhood • Talmud • Malamud •matchwood • Dagwood • Blackwood •sandalwood • sapwood • basswood •Atwood •Harewood, Larwood •hardwood • lancewood • heartwood •redwood • Wedgwood • Elmwood •bentwood • Hailwood • lacewood •beechwood • greenwood • Eastwood •cheesewood • driftwood • stinkwood •Littlewood • giltwood • Hollywood •satinwood • plywood • wildwood •pinewood • whitewood • softwood •dogwood, logwood •cottonwood • coachwood • rosewood •fruitwood • Goodwood • brushwood •firewood • ironwood • underwood •Isherwood • wormwood

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