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alpine plants

alpine plants, high-altitude representatives of various flowering plants (chiefly perennials) that because of their dwarf habit, profuse blooming, and the preference of many for shady places are cultivated in alpine and rock gardens. Some species require specially constructed gardens duplicating mountain terrain, including systems for supplying cool water underground, comparable to the melting snows of their natural habitat. Others thrive without special care in favorable conditions (e.g., cool climate, short growing season, and alkaline, rocky soil). Alpine species of gentians, saxifrages, and stonecrops are among those most commonly planted. Many garden plants (e.g., roses, irises, and primroses) have alpine representatives. The edelweiss is a popular alpine.

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alpine

al·pine / ˈalˌpīn/ • adj. [usu. attrib] of or relating to high mountains: alpine habitats. ∎  (in the names of plants and animals) growing or found on high mountains: the alpine forget-me-not. ∎  (Alpine) of or relating to the Alps. ∎  (also Alpine) (of skiing) involving downhill racing. • n. a plant native to mountain districts, often suitable for growing in rock gardens.

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Afro-alpine vegetation

Afro-alpine vegetation On the highest mountains of Africa, above the dwarf or elfin woodlands, are found shrublands and grasslands. These are alpine (alpine zone) in character (hence the term ‘Afro-alpine’) and, besides containing plants found at lower altitudes in middle and high latitudes, they also include endemics (see endemism), e.g. the giant lobelias and groundsels on Ruwenzori and Kilimanjaro in Kenya.

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Afro—alpine vegetation

Afro—alpine vegetation On the highest mountains of Africa, above the dwarf or elfin woodlands, are found shrublands and grasslands. These are alpine (alpine zone) in character (hence the term ‘Afro-alpine’) and, besides containing plants found at lower altitudes in middle and high latitudes, they also include endemics (see ENDEMISM), e.g. the giant lobelias and groundsels on Ruwenzori and Kilimanjaro.

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alpine

alpine •canine • asinine • leonine • saturnine •Antonine • pavonine • rapine •alpine, cisalpine •pitchpine • orpine •lupine, supine •porcupine • vulpine • salamandrine •alexandrine • sapphirine • taurine •endocrine • aventurine • vulturine •colubrine • lacustrine • estuarine •viperine • passerine • catarrhine •intrauterine, uterine •adulterine • riverine • ensign •internecine, V-sign •piscine • porcine • cosine • thylacine •countersign •hircine, ursine •shoeshine • moonshine • sunshine •earthshine •adamantine, Byzantine, elephantine •Tridentine • Levantine • Bechstein •Epstein • amethystine • Rubinstein •Frankenstein • Palestine • Philistine •turpentine • Einstein • Eisenstein •cispontine, transpontine •serotine • infantine • Wittgenstein •Argentine • Palatine •Ballantyne, valentine •eglantine • Hammerstein •clementine • vespertine • serpentine •Florentine •Lichtenstein, Liechtenstein •Constantine • nemertine • Bernstein •hyacinthine, labyrinthine •Jugurthine • grapevine • bovine •Glühwein • cervine • equine

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