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nautilus (in zoology)

nautilus or chambered nautilus,cephalopod mollusk belonging to the sole surviving genus (Nautilus) of a subclass that flourished 200 million years ago, known as the nautiloids. The spirally coiled shell consists of a series of chambers; as the nautilus grows it secretes larger chambers, sealing off the old ones with thin septa. The animal lives in the largest and newest chamber, with a tubular elongation of the body, known as the siphuncle, extending through the septa to the apex of the shell. The siphuncle removes liquid from the chambers and replaces it with gas, giving the animal the buoyancy that permits it to swim (backwards except when feeding), which it accomplishes by ejecting water through a funnel.

The nautilus breathes by means of two pairs of gills; it feeds on crabs and other animals, which it catches with its long, slender tentacles (numbering more than 90) that encircle the mouth. There is a thickened area over the head, called the hood, that acts as a protective lid when the animal withdraws into the shell. The nautilus lives in deep water in the S Pacific and Indian oceans. It is active at night; during the day it stays hidden in coral crevices. It is hunted for its shell, which is used in jewelry and ornaments.

The paper nautilus, which is not a true nautilus, is a close relative of the octopus, belonging to the order Octopoda. The true nautilus is classified in the phylum Mollusca, class Cephalopoda, order Nautilida, family Nautilidae.

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Nautilus

NAUTILUS

NAUTILUS. The Nautilus, a "diving boat" armed with a torpedo, designed and built at Rouen, France, by Robert Fulton, was launched on 24 July 1800. After several successful submersions of it, Fulton submitted his plans for submarine operations against England's navy to Napoleon Bonaparte, who advanced ten thousand francs for repairs and improvements to the Nautilus. Although Fulton blew up a French sloop with the Nautilus, at Brest, 11 August 1801, he dismantled it when Napoleon offered no further encouragement. The U.S. Navy resurrected the name for the first nuclear powered submarine, the U.S.S. Nautilus, completed in 1954.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Hoyt, Edwin P. From the Turtle to the Nautilus: The Story of Submarines. Boston: Little, Brown, 1963.

Hutcheon, Wallace. Robert Fulton, Pioneer of Undersea Warfare. Annapolis, Md.: Naval Institute Press, 1981.

Louis H.Bolander/a. r.

See alsoArms Race and Disarmament ; Submarines ; Torpedo Warfare .

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nautilus

nau·ti·lus / ˈnôtl-əs/ • n. (pl. nau·ti·lus·es or nau·ti·li / ˈnôtl-ī/ ) 1. a cephalopod mollusk with a light external spiral shell and numerous short tentacles around the mouth. Nautiluses swim with the buoyant gas-filled shell upright and descend to greater depths during the day. • Genus Nautilus, the only surviving genus of the subclass Nautiloidea: several species, in particular the common chambered nautilus (Nautilus pompilius) of the Indo-Pacific, with a shell that is white with brownish bands on the outside and lined with mother-of-pearl on the inside. 2. (also paper nautilus) another term for argonaut.

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nautilus

nautilus (chambered nautilus) cephalopod mollusc found in w Pacific and e Indian Oceans at depths down to 200m (660ft). Its large, coiled shell divides into numerous, gas-filled chambers, which give it buoyancy. The foremost chamber contains the body. Its head has 60–90 retractable, thin tentacles without suckers, and it moves by squirting water from a funnel. Shell size c.25cm (10in). Family Nautilidae; genus Nautilus.

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Nautilus

Nautilus a name given to Robert Fulton's ‘diving boat’ (1800), also to the fictitious submarine in Jules Verne's Twenty Thousand Leagues under the Sea. It became the name of the first nuclear-powered submarine, launched in 1954.

Nautilus is a Latin word, from Greek nautilos, literally ‘sailor’.

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Nautilus

Nau·ti·lus / ˈnôtl-əs/ the first nuclear-powered submarine, launched in 1954. This U.S. Navy vessel made a historic journey (August 1–5, 1958) under the ice of the North Pole. ∎ trademark an exercise machine that matches resistance with output of force.

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nautilus

nautilus cephalopod which has webbed dorsal arms formerly believed to be used as sails. XVII. — L. — Gr. nautilos sailor, nautilus, f. naútēs (see prec.).

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Nautilus

Nautilus See NAUTILIDA; NAUTILOIDEA.

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Nautilus (vessel)

Nautilus: see submarine.

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nautilus

nautilusCallas, callous, callus, Dallas, Pallas, phallus •Nablus • manless •hapless, mapless •atlas, fatless, hatless •braless, parlous •armless • artless •jealous, zealous •endless • legless • sexless • airless •talus • bacillus • windlass • Nicklaus •obelus • strobilus •acidophilus, Theophilus •angelus • Aeschylus • perilous •scurrilous • Wenceslas • nautilus •Silas, stylus •jobless •godless, rodless •Patroclus • topless • coxless •lawless, oarless •Aeolus, alveolus, bolas, bolus, gladiolus, holus-bolus, solus, toeless •Troilus • Douglas • useless • Tibullus •garrulous • querulous • fabulous •miraculous • calculus • famulus •crapulous • patulous • nebulous •credulous, sedulous •pendulous • regulus •emulous, tremulous •bibulous • acidulous •meticulous, ridiculous •mimulus, stimulus •scrofulous • flocculus • Romulus •populace, populous •convolvulus •altocumulus, cirrocumulus, cumulus, stratocumulus, tumulus •scrupulous •furunculous, homunculus, ranunculus •Catullus • troublous •gunless, sunless •cutlass, gutless •earless • Heliogabalus •libellous (US libelous) • discobolus •scandalous • Daedalus • astragalus •Nicholas • anomalous • Sardanapalus •tantalus •marvellous (US marvelous) •frivolous • furless • surplus

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