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moth

moth, any of the large and varied group of insects which, along with the butterflies, make up the order Lepidoptera. The moths comprise the great majority of the 100,000 species of the order, and about 70 of its 80 families. The adult moth, like the butterfly, has sucking mouthparts, two compound eyes, and two pairs of wings that function as a single pair and are covered with flattened, dustlike scales. It is distinguished from butterflies by its stouter, usually hairy body and its unknobbed, often feathery antennae. Most moths are nocturnal in their habits, while butterflies are mostly diurnal. A moth flattens its wings against the surface on which it is resting, while a butterfly holds them horizontally. Moths range in size from species with a wingspread of 1/6 in. (2 mm) to the Atlas moth with a wingspread of 10 in. (25 cm). Many are protectively colored to match their backgrounds: their patterns may exactly resemble, for example, certain lichens or the bark of certain trees. Many others have large, eyelike markings on the hind wings that are thought to frighten potential predators. Moths undergo a complete metamorphosis (see insect), from egg through larva and pupa to adult. Moth larvae, or caterpillars, are wingless and wormlike, with a row of simple eyes on either side of the body. They have chewing mouthparts and feed on leaves or other plant material. Many do great damage, such as the bee moth, the codling moth, the gypsy moth, the clothes moth, and the cutworm. The pupa of most moths is protected by a cocoon, built by the larva just before pupating. The cocoon is often made wholly or largely of silk; the cocoon of the domesticated silkworm moth is the source of commercial silk. Some moths make a cocoon of bits of wood or of a leaf, glued together with silk; some pupate underground. During pupation the body form changes to that of the winged adult. Most adult moths feed on the nectar of flowers, and many plants depend on them for pollination. The short-lived adults of certain species do not eat at all. Among the large and beautiful moths of North America are the cecropia moth, largest of the E United States, and the pale green luna moth. Moths are classified in the phylum Arthropoda, class Insecta, order Lepidoptera.

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moth

moth / mô[unvoicedth]/ • n. (pl. moths / mô[voicedth]z; mô[unvoicedth]s/ ) a chiefly nocturnal insect related to the butterflies. It lacks the clubbed antennae of butterflies and typically has a stout body, drab coloration, and wings that fold flat when resting. ∎ inf. short for clothes moth. PHRASES: like a moth to the flame with an irresistible attraction to someone or something.

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moth

moth Insect of the order lepidoptera, found in almost all parts of the world. It is distinguished from a butterfly mainly by its non-clubbed antennae, although there are a few exceptions. Most moths are nocturnal. Like a butterfly, a moth undergoes metamorphosis. It has a long coiled proboscis for sipping liquid food, particularly the nectar of flowers.

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moth

moth insect of the genus Tinea or (earlier) its larva OE.; nocturnal lepidopterous insect XVIII. OE. moe, mohe; obscurely rel. to synon. MLG., MDu., (M)HG. motte (Du. mot), ON. motti.

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moth

mothbroth, cloth, froth, Goth, moth, Roth, wrath •Sabaoth • Visigoth •backcloth, sackcloth •saddlecloth • waxcloth • grasscloth •haircloth • J-cloth • sailcloth •tablecloth • facecloth • cheesecloth •dishcloth • washcloth • oilcloth •loincloth • hawkmoth

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