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crayfish

crayfish or crawfish, freshwater crustacean smaller than but structurally very similar to its marine relative the lobster, and found in ponds and streams in most parts of the world except Africa. Crayfish grow some 3 to 4 in. (7.6–10.2 cm) in length and are usually brownish green; some cave-dwelling forms are colorless and eyeless. They are scavengers, feeding on decayed organic matter and also on small fish. The swamp crayfish digs a burrow up to 3 ft (91 cm) deep with a water-filled cavity at the bottom in case of drought. The eggs develop while attached to the swimming legs of the female and look like miniature adults when hatched. Although crayfish are not eaten in most parts of the United States, they are consumed in areas in the Mississippi River basin and are used in the Louisiana area in a thick soup called crayfish bisque. They are agricultural pests in the Mississippi Delta area, where they feed on sprouting wheat and corn. A red-clawed species is considered a delicacy in Europe. Crayfish are classified in the phylum Arthropoda, subphylum Crustacea, order Decapoda.

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crayfish

crayfish †crustacean XIV; fresh-water crustacean XV; spiny lobster XVIII. ME. crevis(se), -es(se) — OF. crevis (mod. écrevisse) — OHG. krebiz (G. krebs) CRAB. Stressed orig. on the final syll., the word developed two types, (i) crevis, whence crevish, which became crayfish (XVI), and (ii) cravis which, through cravish, crafish (XVI), became crawfish (XVII), which survives as the U.S. form.

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crayfish

crayfish Edible, freshwater, ten-legged crustacean that lives in rivers and streams of temperate regions. Smaller than lobsters, crayfish burrow into the banks of streams and feed on animal and vegetable matter. Some cave-dwelling species are blind. Length: normally 8–10cm (3–4in). Families Astacidae (Northern Hemisphere), Parastacidae (Southern Hemisphere), Austroastacidae (Australia).

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crayfish

cray·fish / ˈkrāˌfish/ • n. (pl. same or -fishes) a nocturnal freshwater crustacean (Astacus, Cambarus, and other genera) that resembles a small lobster and inhabits streams and rivers. ∎  another term for spiny lobster.

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crayfish

crayfish Crustaceans; freshwater crayfish are members of the families Astacidae, Parasticidae, and Austroastacidae, sea crayfish (crawfish) of the family Palinuridae. See lobster.

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crawfish

crawfish Crustaceans (without claws) of the family Palinuridae, also called langouste, spiny lobster, rock lobster, sea crayfish. See lobster.

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crawfish

crawfish: see crayfish.

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crawfish

crawfish see CRAYFISH.

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crayfish

crayfish See DECAPODA.

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crawfish

crawfish •raffish • damselfish •catfish, flatfish •garfish, starfish •redfish •elfish, selfish, shellfish •devilfish •crayfish, waifish •stiffish • kingfish • jellyfish •killifish • filefish • pipefish •white fish •offish, standoffish •codfish • dogfish • rockfish • crawfish •swordfish •blowfish, oafish •goldfish •bonefish, stonefish •wolfish •huffish, roughish, toughish •mudfish • monkfish • cuttlefish •lungfish • lumpfish • spearfish •angelfish • parrotfish • silverfish •haggish, waggish •vaguish •biggish, piggish, priggish, whiggish •doggish, hoggish •roguish, voguish •puggish, sluggish, thuggish •largish

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crayfish

crayfish •raffish • damselfish •catfish, flatfish •garfish, starfish •redfish •elfish, selfish, shellfish •devilfish •crayfish, waifish •stiffish • kingfish • jellyfish •killifish • filefish • pipefish •white fish •offish, standoffish •codfish • dogfish • rockfish • crawfish •swordfish •blowfish, oafish •goldfish •bonefish, stonefish •wolfish •huffish, roughish, toughish •mudfish • monkfish • cuttlefish •lungfish • lumpfish • spearfish •angelfish • parrotfish • silverfish •haggish, waggish •vaguish •biggish, piggish, priggish, whiggish •doggish, hoggish •roguish, voguish •puggish, sluggish, thuggish •largish

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