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Homo

Homo The genus of primates that includes modern humans (H. sapiens, the only living representative) and various extinct species. The oldest Homo fossils are those of H. habilis and H. rudolfensis, which first appeared in Africa 2.2–2.4 million years ago. Both species used simple stone tools. H. habilis appears to have been 1–1.5 m tall and had more human-like features and a larger brain than Australopithecus. H. erectus diverged about 1.6 million years ago from H. ergaster in Africa and subsequently spread to Asia. Fossils of H. erectus, which was formerly called Pithecanthropus (ape man), include Java man and Peking man. They are similar to present-day humans except that there was a prominent ridge above the eyes and no forehead or chin. They used crude stone tools and fire. H. ergaster may also have given rise to H. heidelbergensis (represented by Heidelberg man and Boxgrove man). This species now contains all hominid specimens with a mixture of ‘erectus-like’ and ‘modern’ characters, dating from some 800 000 years ago to the emergence of H. sapiens at least 70 000 years ago. Among them are the ancestors of both H. neanderthalensis (Neanderthal man) and H. sapiens. See also Cromagnon man.

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Homo

Homo the genus of primates of which modern humans (Homo sapiens) are the present-day representatives. The genus Homo is believed to have existed for at least two million years, of which H. sapiens has occupied perhaps the last 400,000 years, and modern humans (H. sapiens sapiens) first appeared in the Upper Palaeolithic. Among several extinct species are H. habilis, H. erectus, and H. neanderthalensis, known from remains found at Olduvai Gorge in East Africa, and elsewhere.
Homo sapiens the primate species to which modern humans belong; humans regarded as a species.

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Homo

Ho·mo / ˈhōmō/ the genus of primates of which modern humans (Homo sapiens) are the present-day representatives. ∎  denoting kinds of modern human, often humorously: a textbook example of Homo neuroticus.

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Homo

Homo Genus to which humans belong. Modern humans are classified Homo sapiens sapiens. See also Cro-Magnon; Homo erectus; Homo habilis; Homo sapiens; human evolution; Neanderthal

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homo

ho·mo / ˈhōˌmō/ offens. • n. (pl. -mos) a homosexual man. • adj. homosexual.

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Homo

Homo See HOMINIDAE.

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Homo

Homoammo, Gamow •Rameau • Malmö •demo, memo •Elmo • Palermo •emo, primo, supremo •limo •gizmo, gran turismo, machismo, verismo •Eskimo • Geronimo •duodecimo, octodecimo, sextodecimo •altissimo, fortissimo, generalissimo, pianissimo •proximo • centimo • ultimo • Cosmo •Pontormo •chromo, duomo, Homo, majordomo, Nkomo, promo, slo-mo •Profumo, sumo •Alamo • dynamo • paramo

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HOMO

HOMO Chem. highest occupied molecular orbital

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