Skip to main content
Select Source:

Wayland

Wayland

In myths from northern Europe, a legendary smith used supernatural skills to make weapons and magical items. Known as Wayland in England, the smith appears in Norse* mythology as Volund and in German mythology as Wieland. According to some stories, he was lord of the elves.

The son of a giant and grandson of a mermaid, Wayland served as an apprentice to the wise craftsman Mimir. King Nidud, an evil king of Sweden, captured Wayland and forced the smith to work for him. To prevent Wayland from escaping, the king cut the tendons in his feet, making him lame. He also placed the smith on a remote island.

Wayland took revenge on King Nidud by killing his two young sons and raping his daughter. He crafted gold and jewel-studded drinking bowls from the boys' skulls and sent them to the king. Wayland escaped his island prison by flying away on magical wings (or in some versions a feathered robe), which he had crafted for himself.

supernatural related to forces beyond the normal world; magical or miraculous

English tradition associates Wayland with an ancient stone burial chamber in southern England known as Wayland's Smithy. Legend says that if a traveler ties a horse there, leaves some money, and goes away for a while, horseshoes will appear magically on the animal's hooves. See also NORSE MYTHOLOGY.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Wayland." Myths and Legends of the World. . Encyclopedia.com. 15 Jul. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Wayland." Myths and Legends of the World. . Encyclopedia.com. (July 15, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/news-wires-white-papers-and-books/wayland

"Wayland." Myths and Legends of the World. . Retrieved July 15, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/news-wires-white-papers-and-books/wayland

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

Wayland

Wayland, town (1990 pop. 11,874), Middlesex co., E Mass., W of Boston; settled c.1638, inc. 1835. Electronic and chemical research is carried on there.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Wayland." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 15 Jul. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Wayland." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (July 15, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/wayland

"Wayland." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved July 15, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/wayland

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.