Skip to main content
Select Source:

Adirondack Mountains

Adirondack Mountains (ăd´ərŏn´dăk), mountain mass, NE N.Y., between the St. Lawrence valley in the north and the Mohawk valley in the south; rising to 5,344 ft (1,629 m) at Mt. Marcy, the highest point in the state. Geologically a southern extension of the Canadian Shield, the Adirondacks are sometimes mistakenly included in the Appalachian system. Chiefly metamorphic in composition, they were formed as granite and other rocks intruded upward, doming the earth's surface; later faulting and surface erosion, particularly by glaciers, resulted in a rugged topography, with 46 peaks over 4,000 ft (1,220 m), scenic gorges, waterfalls, streams, and ponds. In the 1980s many Adirondack lakes were found to be unable to support life because of acid rain pollution. The Hudson, Ausable, and Black rivers rise in the Adirondacks. The region contains many resorts, including the famous "great camps" ; most of it has been set aside as Adirondack Park, the largest (9,375 sq mi/24,281 sq km, roughly 40% public and 60% private land) U.S. park outside Alaska. Lake Placid and Lake George are major centers. After intensive 19th-century lumbering, the industry has gradually declined. Mines in the Adirondacks have produced iron ore, titanium, vanadium, and talc. The Adirondack Museum, in Blue Mountain Lake, and the Wild Center–Natural History Museum of the Adirondacks, in Tupper Lake, focus on the human and natural histories of the region, respectively.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Adirondack Mountains." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 25 Feb. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Adirondack Mountains." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (February 25, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/adirondack-mountains

"Adirondack Mountains." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved February 25, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/adirondack-mountains

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

Adirondack Mountains

Adirondack Mountains Circular mountain group located in ne New York, USA, reaching from Mohawk valley in the s to the St Lawrence River in the n. There are many gorges, waterfalls, and lakes. Much of the area makes up the Adirondack Forest Preserve. Noted for its resorts (including Lake Placid) its highest point is Mount Marcy, at 1629m (5344ft).

http://www.adirondacks.com

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Adirondack Mountains." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. 25 Feb. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Adirondack Mountains." World Encyclopedia. . Encyclopedia.com. (February 25, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/adirondack-mountains-0

"Adirondack Mountains." World Encyclopedia. . Retrieved February 25, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/environment/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/adirondack-mountains-0

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.