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hook

hook / hoŏk/ • n. 1. a piece of metal or other material, curved or bent back at an angle, for catching hold of or hanging things on: a picture hook. ∎  (also fishhook) a bent piece of metal, typically barbed and baited, for catching fish. ∎  a cradle on which a telephone receiver rests. ∎ fig. a thing designed to catch people's attention: companies are looking for a sales hook. ∎  a chorus or repeated instrumental passage in a piece of music, esp. a pop or rock song, that gives it immediate appeal and makes it easy to remember. 2. a curved cutting instrument, esp. as used for reaping or shearing. 3. a short swinging punch made with the elbow bent, esp. in boxing: a perfectly timed right hook to the chin. ∎  Golf a stroke that makes the ball deviate in flight in the direction of the follow-through (from right to left for a right-handed player), typically inadvertently. Compare with slice. 4. a curved stroke in handwriting, esp. as made in learning to write. ∎  Mus. an added stroke transverse to the stem in the symbol for an eighth note or other note. 5. [usu. in place names] a curved promontory or sand spit. • v. 1. [tr.] attach or fasten with a hook or hooks: the truck had a red lamp hooked to its tailgate she tried to hook up her bra. ∎  [intr.] be or become attached with a hook: a ladder that hooks over the roof ridge. ∎  bend or be bent into the shape of a hook so as to fasten around or to an object: [tr.] he hooked his thumbs in his belt | [intr.] her legs hooked around mine. 2. [tr.] catch with a hook: he hooked a 24-lb pike. ∎  (usu. be hooked) inf. captivate: I was hooked by John's radical zeal. ∎ archaic, inf. steal. 3. [tr.] Golf strike (the ball) or play (a stroke) so that the ball deviates in the direction of the follow-through, typically inadvertently. ∎  [intr.] Boxing punch one's opponent with the elbow bent. 4. [tr.] Rugby push (the ball) backward with the foot from the front line in a scrum. ∎  [intrans.] (of a player) hook the ball. PHRASES: by hook or by crook by any possible means: the government intends, by hook or by crook, to hold on to the land. get one's hooks into inf. get hold of: they were going to move out rather than let Mel get his hooks into them. get (or give someone) the hook inf. be dismissed (or dismiss someone) from a job. hook, line, and sinker used to emphasize that someone has been completely deceived or tricked: he fell hook, line, and sinker for this year's April Fool joke. off the hook 1. inf. no longer in difficulty or trouble: I lied to get him off the hook. 2. (of a telephone receiver) not on its rest, and so preventing incoming calls. on the hook for inf. (in a financial context) responsible for: he's on the hook for about $9.5 million. on one's own hook inf., dated on one's own account; by oneself.PHRASAL VERBS: hook someone/something up (or hook up) link or be linked to electronic equipment: Ali was hooked up to an electrocardiograph.DERIVATIVES: hook·less adj. hook·let / -lit/ n. hook·like / -ˌlīk/ adj.

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"hook." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 16 Aug. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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hook

hook sb. OE. hōc = MLG., MDu. hōk (Du. hoek) corner, angle, point of land, rel. to OE. haca bolt, OS. haco (MDu. hake, Du. haak), OHG. hāko (G. haken) hook, ON. haki, and Russ. kógot' claw, iron hook.
Hence hook vb. †bend, curve XIII; attach (as) with a hook XVI.

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hook

hook by hook or by crook by one means or another; the expression is of longstanding, but there is no clear evidence for the origin.
hook, line, and sinker used to emphasize that someone has been completely deceived or tricked (with allusion to the taking of bait by a fish).

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hook

hook (huuk) n. a surgical instrument with a bent or curved tip, used to hold, lift, or retract tissue at operation.

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hook

hookbetook, book, brook, Brooke, Chinook, chook, Coke, cook, Cooke, crook, forsook, Gluck, hook, look, mistook, nook, partook, rook, schnook, schtuck, Shilluk, shook, Tobruk, took, undercook, undertook •handbook •chapbook, scrapbook •cash book • passbook • sketchbook •chequebook • textbook •daybook, playbook •casebook • phrase book • dybbuk •pocketbook • copybook • storybook •guidebook • logbook • songbook •scorebook • hornbook • sourcebook •notebook • cookbook • yearbook •picture book • wordbook • workbook •caoutchouc • Windhoek • billhook •fishhook • skyhook • buttonhook •tenterhook • wet look • outlook •Inuk • inglenook • Sihanouk •Pembroke • Innsbruck • donnybrook •Uruk • Osnabrück • Beaverbrook •nainsook

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Hook

Hook ★★ 1991 (PG)

Although he said he was never gonna to do it, Peter Pan has grown up. Uptight Peter Banning places work before family and has forgotten all about Neverland and the evil Captain Hook, until Hook kidnaps the Banning kids and takes them to Neverland. With the help of Tinkerbell, her magic pixie dust, and happy thoughts, Peter rescues his kids and rediscovers his youth while visiting with the Lost Boys. The sets and special effects are spectacular; the direction less so. Big-budget fantasy lacks the charm it needs to really fly. Still, kids seem to love it. You'll have to look hard to spot pirates Crosby and Close. Futurizes the J.M. Barrie classic. 142m/C VHS, DVD . Dustin Hoffman, Robin Williams, Julia Roberts, Bob Hoskins, Maggie Smith, Charlie Korsmo, Caroline Goodall, Amber Scott, Phil Collins, Arthur Malet, Dante Basco, Gwyneth Paltrow, Glenn Close, David Crosby; D: Steven Spielberg; W: Nick Castle; C: Dean Cundey; M: John Williams.

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