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Kew Gardens

Kew Gardens (Surrey). Location of the Royal Botanical Gardens, which contain a vast collection of herbs, trees, and shrubs gathered from all over the world. Kew Gardens evolved from two adjoining 18th-cent. royal estates: Richmond Gardens, belonging to George II and Queen Caroline, and Kew House, the residence of their son Frederick, prince of Wales, and his consort Princess Augusta. Charles Bridgeman assisted in the laying out of Richmond Gardens, where William Kent designed the Hermitage (1730) and Merlin's Cave (1735). After George III inherited Richmond in 1760, he had the parkland re-landscaped by Capability Brown (1764–73). At adjacent Kew, following the death of Frederick in 1751, the Dowager Princess Augusta employed Sir William Chambers to lay out the grounds and to embellish them with a variety of temples and garden buildings, some classical and others oriental in style, including the orangery (1757–61), the Alhambra (1758), the Temple of the Sun (1761), and the pagoda (1761–2). These were publicized in Chambers's book Plans, Elevations, Sections and Perspective Views of the Gardens and Buildings at Kew in Surrey (1763). Two other major buildings at Kew—both pioneering structures largely in glass and cast iron—are the Palm House (1845–8) by Decimus Burton and Richard Turner, and Burton's Temperate House (1859–62, wings added 1895–7, restored 1977–82). In 1844–8 the area around the Royal Botanic Gardens was landscaped by William Andrews Nesfield (1793–1881), with the Palm House the pivot of his layout.

Peter Willis

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Kew Gardens

Kew Gardens (kyōō), Kew, Surrey, S England, on the Thames just W of London; Royal Botanic Gardens is the official name. The gardens were founded by the dowager princess of Wales in 1761 and consisted of about 9 acres (3.6 hectares). In 1841 they were presented to the nation as a royal gift. They now cover 288 acres (117 hectares) and contain thousands of species of plants, four museums, and laboratories and hothouses. The Chinese Pagoda, c.165 ft (50 m) high, was designed by William Chambers in 1761; it is still a famous landmark. Near the main entrance is Kew Palace, a red-brick mansion, once the home of George III and Queen Charlotte. In 1965 the Royal Botanic Gardens leased Wakehurst Place, Ardingly, West Sussex, an estate dating to the 13th cent. that is the site of a Tudor mansion and grounds landscaped with fine collections of temperate trees and shrubs. The Millennium Seed Bank, a modern facility storing hundreds of millions of seeds from around the world, is also located at Wakehurst Place.

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Kew Gardens

Kew Gardens (Royal Botanic Gardens) Collection of plants and trees in sw London, UK. Founded in 1760 by George III's mother, they were given to the nation by Queen Victoria in 1840. Much plant research is carried out here.

http://www.rbgkew.org.uk

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Kew Gardens

Kew Gardens the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew, in Richmond, London. Developed by the mother of George III with the aid of Sir Joseph Banks, the gardens were presented to the nation in 1841 and are now an important botanical institution.

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