Catechism

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Catechism (Gk., katēcheō, ‘instruct’). An elementary manual of Christian doctrine. In the Middle Ages books were produced containing explanations of the Lord's Prayer and creed, lists of mortal sins, etc. It was the Reformation, however, with its insistence on religious instruction, which brought forth the catechisms known today. Catechisms normally contain expositions of the creed, Lord's Prayer, and the Ten Commandments; RC ones add instructions on the Hail Mary, sacraments, virtues and vices, and extend into virtually every area of doctrine and behaviour.

catechism

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cat·e·chism / ˈkatəˌkizəm/ • n. a summary of the principles of Christian religion in the form of questions and answers, used for the instruction of Christians. ∎  a series of fixed questions, answers, or precepts used for instruction in other situations. DERIVATIVES: cat·e·chis·mal / ˌkatəˈkizəməl/ adj.

catechism

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catechism a summary of the principles of Christian religion in the form of questions and answers, used for the instruction of Christians. The word is recorded from the early 16th century and comes via ecclesiastical Latin from ecclesiastical Greek katēkhizein ‘instruct orally, make hear’.

catechism

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catechism Manual of instruction in Christian church teachings, for use by the young or by any candidate preparing for admission to membership of a church. In some sects, it provides a medium of instruction for baptized members. A catechism often takes the form of question and answer.

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