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Gehenna

Gehenna

One of the words in the Christian New Testament for hell, the place of destruction. The word is derived from the Hebrew ge and hinnom, the Valley of Hinnomoriginally a valley in Palestine where the Hebrews passed their children through the fire to Moloch, the god of the Ammonites (1 Kings 11; 2 Kings 23:10).

Gehenna was popularly regarded as a place of destruction to which the wicked were consigned when they died (Matt. 18:7-8). Gehenna is usually translated as "hell fire" in the New Testament (Mark 9:43; Luke 12:5). Over the centuries it was merged with other terms for the abode of the dead, and through the writings of novelists such as Dante and John Milton the Christian world was given a description of hell as a place of unutterable anguish, horror, and despair.

The locality of hell and the duration of its torments have for centuries been the subject of much speculation. Some imagined there was a purgatorial regiona kind of upper Gehenna "in which the souls of just men are cleansed by a temporary punishment" before being admitted to heaven. It was believed that during this period the soul could revisit the places and persons it had loved. The Persians understood Gehenna as the place inhabited by the divs (rebellious angels), to which the rebels were confined when they refused to bow down before the first man.

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Gehenna

Gehenna in Judaism and the New Testament, hell. The name comes via ecclesiastical Latin from Greek geenna, from Hebrew gē' hinnōm ‘hell’, literally ‘valley of Hinnom’, a place near Jerusalem where children were sacrificed to Baal, as in Jeremiah 19:6.

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Gehenna

Gehenna, Gehinnom (Heb., Valley of Hinnom). A valley south of Jerusalem, used as a waste tip. It became a place where the wicked are abandoned with none to remember them, and where they are tormented after death. Gehenna is the Gk. form of the name.

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"Gehenna." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Feb. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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Gehenna

Gehenna (gĬhĕn´ə): see hell.

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