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Asmodeus

Asmodeus

Ancient Persian demon of lust and rage who also appeared in ancient Jewish folklore, where he was believed to cause strife between husband and wife. He is mentioned in the book of Tobit ca. 250 B.C.E., where he attempts to cause trouble between Tobias and his wife, Sarah. Jewish legends claim that Asmodeus was the result of a union between the woman Naamah and a fallen angel. Asmodeus was often represented in magical texts as having three headsa man, a bull, and a ram, riding a dragon, and carrying a spear. Directions for evoking this demon are contained in the well-known magical textbook The Magus; or, Celestial Intelligencer by Francis Barrett (1801).

Sources:

Barrett, Francis. The Magus. London, 1801. Reprint, New Hyde Park, N.Y.: University Books, 1967.

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Asmodeus

Asmodeus or Ashmedai. An evil spirit. He first appears in Tobit and subsequently in the Testament of Solomon. In folklore he often appears as the butt of jokes and is frequently seen as a kindly spirit and the friend of human beings.

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Asmodeus

Asmodeus a demon in the apocryphal book of Tobit, who has killed the former husbands of Sara on their wedding-nights.

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Asmodeus

Asmodeus (ăs´mōdē´əs), demon of Hebrew story. He plays an important role in the Book of Tobit.

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