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shepherd

shep·herd / ˈshepərd/ • n. a person who tends and rears sheep. ∎ fig. a member of the clergy who provides spiritual care and guidance for a congregation. ∎  short for German shepherd. • v. [tr.] [usu. as n.] (shepherding) tend (sheep) as a shepherd. ∎  [tr.] guide or direct in a particular direction: we were shepherded around with great ceremony. ∎  give guidance to (someone), esp. on spiritual matters: she had to submit the control of her career and money to a group who shepherded her.

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Shepherd

586. Shepherd

  1. Corin the faithful shepherdess; called the Virgin of the Grove. [Br. Lit.: The Faithful Shepherdess in Brewer Handbook, 234]
  2. Daphnis guards sheep; creator of bucolic poetry. [Gk. Myth.: Kravitz, 75]
  3. Jabal father of herdsmen. [O.T.: Genesis 4:20]
  4. Jesus Christ the Good Shepherd. [NJ.: John 10:11 14]
  5. Little Bo-peep young shepherdess; searches everywhere for lost flock. [Nurs. Rhyme: Opie, 93]
  6. Little Boy Blue asleep while his sheep are in the field. [Nurs. Rhyme: Baring-Gould, 46]

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shepherd

shepherd in biblical usage, the image of the shepherd caring for his flock is a strong one; God is seen as the shepherd of his people, and in Luke 2:8 the shepherds to whom the announcement of the Nativity is made are described as ‘abiding in the field, keeping watch over their flock by night’.

In pastoral poetry, shepherd is a designation of one of the rustic characters; from this, in 16th-century poetry adopting the pastoral convention, the name is often used for the writer and his friends and fellow poets.

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shepherd

shepherd sb. Late OE. sċēaphierde; see SHEEP, HERD2.
Hence vb. XVIII, shepherdess XIV.

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Shepherd

Shep·herd / ˈshepərd/ , Michael, see Ludlum.

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shepherd

shepherdballad, salad •collard, Lollard, pollard •bicoloured (US bicolored), dullard, multicoloured (US multicolored), particoloured (US particolored), self-coloured (US self-colored), uncoloured (US uncolored), varicoloured (US varicolored), versicoloured (US versicolored) •enamored, Muhammad •ill-humoured (US ill-humored) •Seanad, unmannered •Leonard • synod • unhonoured •Bernard, gurnard •unhampered •leopard, shepherd •untempered •Angharad, Harrod •Herod • hundred • unanswered •uncensored • unsponsored •Blanchard • dastard • unchartered •bastard • unlettered • unsheltered •self-centred (US self-centered) • it'd •unfiltered • unregistered • unwatered •unaltered • dotard • untutored •uncluttered, unuttered •bustard, custard, mustard •method • unbothered • Harvard •unflavoured (US unflavored) •lily-livered, undelivered •undiscovered

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