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Pluto

Pluto1 in Greek mythology, the god of the underworld, Hades; Pluto is the Latin form (used in English) of the Greek name Ploutōn, meaning ‘wealth-giver’, because wealth is seen as coming from the earth.

The name Pluto was given to what was then the most remote known planet of the solar system, ninth in order from the sun, discovered in 1930 by Clyde Tombaugh. It is now considered a dwarf planet.

Pluto was also the name of the black cartoon dog which made its first appearance with Mickey Mouse in Walt Disney's The Chain Gang, 1930.

Plutonian means of or associated with the underworld or the god Pluto; infernal; gloomy and dark.

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Pluto (in Greek religion and mythology)

Pluto, in Greek religion and mythology, god of the underworld, son of Kronos and Rhea; also called Hades. After the fall of the Titans, Pluto and his brothers Zeus and Poseidon divided the universe, and Pluto was awarded everything underground. There, with Persephone as his queen, he ruled over Hades. Not only a god of the dead, he is identified as a god of the earth's fertility. The Romans derived their god of the dead—Orcus, Dis, or Dis Pater—from Pluto.

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Dis

Dis in Roman mythology, the ruler of the Underworld, equivalent of the Greek Pluto (see Pluto1) or Hades; the name, as coming from Dives ‘rich’, may be a translation for Pluto.

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