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Cushing, Luther Stearns

CUSHING, LUTHER STEARNS

"All language, not addressed to the house, in a parliamentary course, must be considered noise and disturbitive."
—Luther Cushing

Luther Stearns Cushing achieved prominence as a legal educator, author, and jurist. He was born June 22, 1803, in Lunenberg, Massachusetts.

Cushing graduated from Harvard University with a bachelor of laws degree in 1826.

From 1826 to 1832, Cushing was an editor for The American Jurist and Law Magazine. For the next twelve years, he served in the state government system as clerk of the Massachusetts House of Representatives.

Cushing entered the judicial phase of his career in 1844, presiding as judge of the Boston Court of Common Pleas for a four-year period. In 1848, he became a reporter for the Massachusetts Supreme Court, performing these duties until 1853.

In 1848 Cushing returned to his alma mater, Harvard University, and presented a series of lectures on roman law at the Harvard Law School until 1851.

As an author, Cushing is famous for several publications, including A Manual of Parliamentary Practice, also known as Cushing's Manual, published in 1844, and Elements of the Law and Practice of the Legislative Assemblies in the United States, published in 1856.

Cushing died June 22, 1856, in Boston, Massachusetts.

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Cushing, Luther Stearns

Luther Stearns Cushing, 1803–56, American lawyer, b. Lunenburg, Mass., grad. Harvard Law School, 1826. His best-known work is his short Manual of Parliamentary Practice (1844; many later editions), usually known as Cushing's Manual. It is still used in the United States in conducting meetings and legislative activities. Cushing's fuller treatment of the subject is Elements of the Law and Practice of Legislative Assemblies (1856).

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