Skip to main content
Select Source:

put

put / poŏt/ • v. (put·ting ; past put ) [tr.] 1. move to or place in a particular position: Harry put down his cup I put my hand out toward her watch where you're putting your feet! ∎  cause (someone or something) to go to a particular place and remain there for a time: India has put three experimental satellites into space. ∎  [intr.] (of a ship or the people on it) proceed in a particular direction: she stepped into the boat and put out to sea. ∎  write or print (something) in a particular place: they put my name on the cover page. ∎  [intr.] archaic (of a river) flow in a particular direction. 2. bring into a particular state or condition: they tried to put me at ease a large aid program was put into effect he is putting himself at risk. ∎  (put oneself in) imagine oneself in (a particular situation): it was no use trying to put herself in his place. ∎  express (a thought or comment) in a particular way, form, or language: to put it bluntly, he was not really divorced. 3. (put something on/on to) cause (someone or something) to carry or be subject to something: commentators put some of the blame on Congress. ∎  assign a particular value, figure, or limit to: it is very difficult to put a figure on the size of the budget. ∎  (put something at) estimate something to be (a particular amount): estimates put the war's cost at $1,000,000 a day. 4. throw (a shot or weight) as an athletic sport: she set a women's record by putting the shot 56′ 7″. • n. 1. a throw of the shot or weight. 2. Stock Market short for put option. PHRASES: put something behind one get over a bad experience by distancing oneself from it: they have tried to put their grief behind them and rebuild their lives. put the clocks back (or forward) adjust clocks or watches backward (or forward) to take account of official changes in time. put someone's eyes out blind someone, typically in a violent way. put one's hands together applaud; clap: I want you all to put your hands together for Barry. put one's hands up raise one's hands in surrender. put it there [in imper.] inf. used to indicate that the speaker wishes to shake hands with someone in agreement or congratulation: put it there, Steven, we beat them. put it to make a statement or allegation to (someone) and challenge them to deny it: I put it to him that he was just a political groupie. put one over on inf. deceive (someone) into accepting something false. put up or shut up inf. justify oneself or remain silent: they called for the alderman to either put up or shut up.PHRASAL VERBS: put about Naut. (of a ship) turn on the opposite tack. put something about (often be put about) spread information or rumors. put something across (or over) communicate something effectively. put something aside 1. save money for future use. 2. forget or disregard something, typically a feeling or a past difference. put someone away (often be put away) inf. confine someone in a prison or psychiatric hospital: he deserves to be put away forever. put something away 1. save money for future use. 2. inf. consume food or drink in large quantities. 3. another way of saying put something down (sense 3 below). 4. inf. (in sports) dispatch or deal with a goal or shot. put something back reschedule a planned event to a later time or date. ∎  delay something: greater public control may put back the modernization of the industry. put something byanother way of saying put something aside (sense 1 above). put someone down 1. inf. lower someone's self-esteem by criticizing them in front of others. 2. lay a baby down to sleep. put something down 1. record something in writing: he's putting a few thoughts down on paper. 2. suppress a rebellion, riot, or other disturbance by force. 3. (usu. be put down) kill an animal because it is sick, injured, or old. 4. pay a specified sum as a deposit: he put a thousand down and paid the rest over six months. 5. preserve or store food or wine for future use. 6. (also put down) land an aircraft. put someone down as consider or judge someone or something to be: I'd have put you down as a Vivaldi man. put something down to attribute something to: if I forget anything, put it down to old age. put someone forward recommend someone as a suitable candidate for a job or position: he put me forward as head of publicity. put something forward submit a plan, proposal, or theory for consideration. put in [with direct speech] interrupt a conversation or discussion: “But you're a sybarite, Roger,” put in Isobel. put in at/into (of a ship) enter (a port or harbor). put someone in appoint someone to fulfill a particular role or job: he was put in to rescue the company by the stockbrokers. ∎  (in team sports) send a player out to participate into a game. put something in/into 1. present or submit something formally: the airport had put in a claim for damages. ∎  (put in for) apply formally for: Adam put in for six months' leave. 2. devote time or effort to something: employed mothers put in the longest hours of all women. 3. invest money or resources in. put someone off 1. cancel or postpone an appointment with someone: he'd put off Martin until nine o'clock. 2. cause someone to lose interest or enthusiasm: she wanted to be a nurse, but the thought of night shifts put her off. ∎  cause someone to feel dislike or distrust: she had a coldness that just put me off. 3. distract someone: you're just trying to put me off my game. put something off postpone something: they can't put off a decision much longer. put someone on inf. deceive or hoax someone. put something on 1. place a garment, glasses, or jewelry on part of one's body: Julie had put on a cotton dress. ∎  attach or apply something: she put on fresh makeup. 2. cause a device to operate: shall I put the light on? ∎  start cooking something: she was moaning that he hadn't put the dinner on. ∎  play recorded music or a video. 3. organize or present a play, exhibition, or event. ∎  provide a public transportation service: so many people wanted to visit this spot that an extra flight had to be put on. 4. add a specified amount to (the cost of something): the news put 12 cents on the share price. ∎  increase in body weight; become heavier by a specified amount: she's given up her diet and put on 20 lbs. 5. assume a particular expression, accent, etc.: he put on a lugubrious look. ∎  behave deceptively: she doesn't feel she has to put on an act. 6. bet a specified amount of money on: he put $1,000 on the horse to win. put someone on to draw someone's attention to (someone or something useful, notable, or interesting): Pike put me on to the department's legal section. put out vulgar slang be willing to have sexual intercourse. put someone out 1. cause someone trouble or inconvenience: would it put you out too much to let her visit you for a couple of hours? ∎  (often be put out) upset or annoy someone: he was not put out by the rebuff. 2. (in sports) defeat a player or team and so cause them to be out of a competition. 3. make someone unconscious, typically by means of drugs or an anesthetic. put something out 1. extinguish something that is burning: firefighters from Georgetown put out the blaze. ∎  turn off a light. 2. lay something out ready for use: she put out glasses and paper napkins. 3. issue or broadcast something: a limited-edition single was put out to promote the album. 4. dislocate a joint: she fell off her horse and put her shoulder out. 5. (of a company) allocate work to a contractor or freelancer to be done off the premises. 6. (of an engine or motor) produce a particular amount of power: the new motor is expected to put out about 250 h.p. put something over 1. another way of saying put something across above. 2. postpone something: let's put the case over for a few weeks. put someone through 1. connect someone by telephone to another person or place: put me through to the mayor, please. 2. subject someone to an unpleasant or demanding experience: I hate Brian for what he put me through. 3. pay for someone to attend school or college. put something through initiate something and see it through to a successful conclusion: he put through a reform program to try to save the regime. put someone to cause inconvenience or difficulty to someone: I don't want to put you to any trouble. put something to 1. submit something to (someone) for consideration or attention: we are making a takeover bid and putting an offer to the shareholders. ∎  2. devote something to (a particular use or purpose): they put the land to productive use. put something together make something by assembling different parts or people: he can take a clock apart and put it back together again they decided to put a new band together. ∎  assemble things or people to make something: a carpenter puts together shaped pieces of wood to make a table. put someone underanother way of saying put someone out (sense 3 above). put up 1. offer or show (a particular degree of resistance, effort, or skill) in a fight or competitive situation: he put up a brave fight. 2. stay temporarily in lodgings other than one's own home: we put up at a hotel in the city center. put someone up 1. accommodate someone temporarily. 2. propose someone for election or adoption: they should have put themselves up for election. put something up 1. construct or erect something: I put up the tent and cooked a meal. 2. raise one's hand to signal that one wishes to answer or ask a question. 3. display a notice, sign, or poster. ∎  present a proposal, theory, or argument for discussion or consideration. 4. provide money as backing for an enterprise: the sponsors are putting up $5,000 for the event. 5. (often be put up for) offer something for sale or auction. 6. archaic return a sword to its sheath. put upon [often as adj.] (put-upon) inf. take advantage of (someone) by exploiting their good nature: a put-upon drudge who slaved for her employer. put someone up to inf. encourage someone to do (something wrong or unwise): Who else would play a trick like that on me? I expect Rose put him up to it. put up with tolerate; endure: I'm too tired to put up with any nonsense.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"put." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Sep. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"put." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. (September 24, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/put-0

"put." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Retrieved September 24, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/put-0

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

Put

PUT

An option—a right that operates as a continuing proposal—given in exchange for consideration—something of value—permitting its holder to sell a particular stock or commodity at a fixed price for a stated quantity and within a limited time period.

A put is purchased for a fee paid to the person who agrees to accept the stock or goods if they are offered. The purchaser of this right to sell expects the price of the stock or commodity to decrease so that he can deliver the stock or commodity at a profit. If the price rises, the option need not be exercised. The reverse transaction is a call.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Put." West's Encyclopedia of American Law. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Sep. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Put." West's Encyclopedia of American Law. . Encyclopedia.com. (September 24, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/law/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/put

"Put." West's Encyclopedia of American Law. . Retrieved September 24, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/law/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/put

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

put

put1 (obs. or dial.) push, thrust, knock, butt (cf. PUTT); transf. in various applications ranging from forcing or urging to placing or setting in a place or position. Fully evidenced from XII onwards; repr. OE. *putian (u of uncertain quantity), repr. only in noun of action putung instigation; parallel forms are OE. potian, ME. pot(t)e, OE. pȳtan, ME. pitte; ult. orig. unkn.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"put." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Sep. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"put." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (September 24, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/put-2

"put." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved September 24, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/put-2

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

Phut

Phut (fŭt), in the Bible, son of Ham and eponym of an African people. It may also be a region, possibly Punt or Libya, and is perhaps the same as Pul2. It also appears as Put.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Phut." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Sep. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Phut." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (September 24, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/phut

"Phut." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved September 24, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/phut

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

phut

phut (sl.) go ph., be a failure. XIX. f. Hindi phaṭnā burst.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"phut." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Sep. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"phut." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (September 24, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/phut-0

"phut." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved September 24, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/phut-0

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

Put

Put, variant of Phut.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Put." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Sep. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Put." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. (September 24, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/put

"Put." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed.. . Retrieved September 24, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/reference/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/put

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

put

put2 see PUTT.

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"put." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Sep. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"put." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Encyclopedia.com. (September 24, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/put-3

"put." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. . Retrieved September 24, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/put-3

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

phut

phutabut, but, butt, cut, glut, gut, hut, intercut, jut, Mut, mutt, nut, phut, putt, rut, scut, shortcut, shut, slut, smut, strut, tut, undercut •sackbut • scuttlebutt • catgut •midgut • Vonnegut • rotgut • haircut •offcut • cross-cut • linocut • crew cut •woodcut • uppercut • chestnut •hazelnut • peanut • wing nut • cobnut •locknut • walnut • groundnut •doughnut (US donut) • coconut •butternut

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"phut." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Sep. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"phut." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. (September 24, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/phut

"phut." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved September 24, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/phut

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

put

putafoot, clubfoot, foot, hotfoot, kaput, put, soot, splay-foot, underfoot, wrong-foot, Yakut •Blackfoot • flatfoot • barefoot •pussyfoot • forefoot • crowfoot •coltsfoot • goosefoot • tenderfoot •per caput • Rajput • output •throughput • Inuktitut

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"put." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Sep. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"put." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Encyclopedia.com. (September 24, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/put

"put." Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes. . Retrieved September 24, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/humanities/dictionaries-thesauruses-pictures-and-press-releases/put

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.

Put

PUT

PUT (Heb. פּוּט), one of the sons of Ham, son of Noah. In the Table of Nations, Put is mentioned, along with Cush, Egypt, and Canaan (Gen. 10:6; i Chron. 1:8). However, whereas the genealogies of the other three are recorded, nothing further is said of Put. However, the people is mentioned several times in the prophetic literature. Referring to the impending conquest of Egypt by Nebuchadnezzar, Jeremiah mentions the "men of Cush and Put, who handle the shield, men of Lud, skilled in handling the bow" (Jer. 46:9). Ezekiel mentions Put along with Persia and Lud as serving in the army of Tyre (Ezek. 27:10). In his prophecy against Egypt, he cites Put, together with Ethiopia (Cush), Lud, Arabia, and Cub (Gr. Libya), as doomed to fall by the sword (Ezek. 30:5), and in his oracle against Gog, he again places Put alongside Persia and Cush (Ezek. 38:5). From the passages cited the exact identity of Put cannot be decided, but an African location is strongly suggested. In all the prophetic passages cited above, except Ezekiel 30:5, the Septuagint translates Put by "Libyans." It would seem then that Put was identified with Libya or possibly some neighboring area such as Cyrene.

bibliography:

A. Reuveni, Shem, Ḥam ve-Yafet (1932), 85–87; U. Cassuto, A Commentary on the Book of Genesis (1964), 200ff.

[Shlomo Balter]

Cite this article
Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

  • MLA
  • Chicago
  • APA

"Put." Encyclopaedia Judaica. . Encyclopedia.com. 24 Sep. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

"Put." Encyclopaedia Judaica. . Encyclopedia.com. (September 24, 2018). http://www.encyclopedia.com/religion/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/put

"Put." Encyclopaedia Judaica. . Retrieved September 24, 2018 from Encyclopedia.com: http://www.encyclopedia.com/religion/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/put

Learn more about citation styles

Citation styles

Encyclopedia.com gives you the ability to cite reference entries and articles according to common styles from the Modern Language Association (MLA), The Chicago Manual of Style, and the American Psychological Association (APA).

Within the “Cite this article” tool, pick a style to see how all available information looks when formatted according to that style. Then, copy and paste the text into your bibliography or works cited list.

Because each style has its own formatting nuances that evolve over time and not all information is available for every reference entry or article, Encyclopedia.com cannot guarantee each citation it generates. Therefore, it’s best to use Encyclopedia.com citations as a starting point before checking the style against your school or publication’s requirements and the most-recent information available at these sites:

Modern Language Association

http://www.mla.org/style

The Chicago Manual of Style

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

American Psychological Association

http://apastyle.apa.org/

Notes:
  • Most online reference entries and articles do not have page numbers. Therefore, that information is unavailable for most Encyclopedia.com content. However, the date of retrieval is often important. Refer to each style’s convention regarding the best way to format page numbers and retrieval dates.
  • In addition to the MLA, Chicago, and APA styles, your school, university, publication, or institution may have its own requirements for citations. Therefore, be sure to refer to those guidelines when editing your bibliography or works cited list.