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Goodhue, Bertram Grosvenor

Goodhue, Bertram Grosvenor (1869–1924). American architect. In partnership with Cram from 1892 to 1913, they designed All Saints' Church, Ashmont, MA (1892–1941), a robust and scholarly work that established their reputation, consolidated with the US Military Academy, West Point, NY (1903–10), and St Thomas's Church, NYC (1906–13—a distinguished work of the Gothic Revival). In 1913 the partnership was dissolved, and Goodhue designed the Cathedral of the Incarnation, Baltimore, MO (1911–24—partly influenced by Giles Gilbert Scott's Anglican Cathedral, Liverpool, which Goodhue saw being built in 1913), St Vincent Ferrer Church, NYC (1914–19), and St Bartholomew's Church, NYC (1914–18—the last in a Byzantine Romanesque style influenced by Bentley's Westminster Cathedral, London), and the Rockefeller Chapel, University of Chicago, IL (1918–28—a very handsome church). Probably his greatest work is the Nebraska State Capitol, Lincoln (1920–32), in a free style, vigorously composed, and with a central tower reminiscent of skyscraper designs. He designed the National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC (1919–24), in a simplified Classical style.

Bibliography

J. Baker (1915);
R. Oliver (1983);
Whitaker (ed.) (1925)

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Goodhue, Bertram Grosvenor

Bertram Grosvenor Goodhue (grōv´nər), 1869–1924, American architect, b. Pomfret, Conn. He studied under James Renwick in New York City and in 1891 entered the office of Ralph Adams Cram in Boston. Later he was made a partner in this firm but left it (1914) to begin independent practice. Goodhue was particularly successful in evolving a distinctive style for his ecclesiastical work, which was Gothic in form yet permeated with a modern spirit. Examples are the churches of St. Thomas and of St. Vincent Ferrer, New York City, and the buildings of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. In his later years he turned from historical design and endeavored to create forms more harmonious with contemporary life and methods of construction, but he died before he could fully accomplish this aim. The most important works of this last period are the building at Washington, D.C., to house the National Academy of Sciences and National Research Council and the state capitol, Lincoln, Neb. Among his other works are St. Bartholomew's Church and the Chapel of the Intercession, New York City, and the First Baptist Church, Pittsburgh.

See biographies by C. H. Whitaker (1925) and R. Oliver (1983).

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