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scalp

scalp / skalp/ • n. the skin covering the head, excluding the face. ∎  hist. the scalp with the hair belonging to it cut or torn away from an enemy's head as a battle trophy, esp. by an American Indian. • v. [tr.] hist. take the scalp of (an enemy). ∎ inf. sell (a ticket) for a popular event at a price higher than the official one: tickets were scalped for forty times their face value. ORIGIN: Middle English (denoting the skull or cranium): probably of Scandinavian origin.

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"scalp." The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English. . Encyclopedia.com. 20 Apr. 2018 <http://www.encyclopedia.com>.

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scalp

scalp, the integument covering the top of the head. It consists of three layers of tissue: the skin, an underlying layer of tissue and blood vessels, and the occipitofrontalis muscle stretching from the eyebrows to the back of the head. Except for its abundant growth of hair, the skin of the scalp resembles that of the rest of the body but is especially rich in blood vessels. Hence profuse bleeding may be associated with scalp injuries.

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scalp

scalp (dial.) top of the head, skull XIII; integument of this XVII. north. ME. scalp, prob. of Scand. orig., but the Eng. senses are not found in any Scand. or other Gmc. lang.: cf. ON. skálpr sheath (Da. dial. skalp shell, husk), MLG. schulpe, MDu. schelpe (Du. schelp) shell.
Hence vb. remove the scalp OF. XVII.

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Scalp

Scalp

an oyster colony or a mussel bed, 1521.

Examples : mussel scalp; 1557; oyster scalps, 1862.

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scalp

scalp (skalp) n. the skin that covers the cranium and is itself covered with hair.

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scalp

scalpalp, scalp •help, kelp, whelp, yelp •gulp, pulp

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